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Winter weather is here and I need to buy some new winter tires. I live in California and drive in a variety of conditions. Most winter driving will be in rain or dry pavement with some occasional snow/ice driving over Donner Summit. I'm looking at several tires with respect to pricing and performance. The Kumho Exsta ASX is available at tire rack for $87/tire. Or I could go for the Perelli P-Zero Nero tires for $129/tire. The Blizzah LM25 is $153. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. If anyone has the Kumho's, I would like to know what you think. I've heard the Kumho's are the best value and are good tires.
 

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i have the Blizzak LM-25 and i love them. i have had no problem last winter driving in the rain or in tahoe in snow. i drive pretty hard and they didnt wear to much either. hope that helps good luck
 

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There is only one true WINTER tire on your list, the Blizzak. I think there are restrictions on what kind of tires they allow to traverse Donner Pass in bad weather, and if I remember them correctly you need actual WINTER tires. Check the CA DOT website for specifics.
 

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The Blizzak is the only one there that meets the industry's "severe snow service" requirements (you can tell this by looking for the snowflake-on-the-mountain-symbol on the sidewall of the tire). For mostly rain or and/or dry pavement, I'd stick with the Blizzak or Dunlop - they're both great tires. I use the Dunlops personally and we get a lot more than "ocassional" snow and ice- they work fine, and have decent dry grip too.

Just slow down, take your time, and remember: AWD doesn't do squat for braking.
 

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Blizzak, Dunlop Wintersport M3, Nokian Hakkapeliitta & Nokian RSi, etc. etc. They all work quite well in snow, some much better than others. The ones that do very well in snow/ice usually are that much less capable in dry and the ones that do very well in dry usually are that much less capable in snow/ice.

The Blizzak and Dunlop are both a decent compromise while the Nokians are very snow-centric.
 

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The Blizzak and Dunlop are both a decent compromise while the Nokians are very snow-centric.
That's a good summary - if you lived in the Canadian Rockies, a set of Hakk's (preferably studded) would definitely be the way to go for winter driving. The problem is if you use them for extended periods on warmer, dry roads, they wear really, really fast - the others are much better suited for that.
 

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That's a good summary - if you lived in the Canadian Rockies, a set of Hakk's (preferably studded) would definitely be the way to go for winter driving. The problem is if you use them for extended periods on warmer, dry roads, they wear really, really fast - the others are much better suited for that.
I just took my RSi's for a 2500 mile road trip that was 95% dry/warm and I wore <1mm. The wear was accelerated compared to in the snow, but not so bad that I wouldn't buy them again.
 

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I'm not familiar with the RSi's - most guys around here opt for the Hakk 2's which have terrific snow and ice grip, but big time wear on dry roads. There's always a compromise somewhere.
 

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i oppted for the nokian WRplus, decent dry handeling ( soft side walls suck lol ), excellent wet handeling, as for snow ill have to wait till the white stuff hits the ground.

donnie
 

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I'm not familiar with the RSi's - most guys around here opt for the Hakk 2's which have terrific snow and ice grip, but big time wear on dry roads. There's always a compromise somewhere.
The RSi is basically designed to be used where the studded hakka can't. Similar sidewalls, but the RSi (which is actually the Hakka RSi) has better siping because it doesn't need to allow for stud holes. I was going places full size 4x4's with M/T's couldn't even get close to. I know because I passed several in the ditch and watched a few go in :lol:.

i oppted for the nokian WRplus, decent dry handeling ( soft side walls suck lol ), excellent wet handeling, as for snow ill have to wait till the white stuff hits the ground.

donnie
A guy locally to me has said that the WR does quite well in the snow for an A/S. YMMV
 

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...I was going places full size 4x4's with M/T's couldn't even get close to.
Not surprising - most of them are simply worthless when it gets slightly slick. When we get bad ice storms I park the subie and we just drive the wife's Highlander with studs - or we simply stay home. When the chain law is in effect in town, it's time for movies and popcorn.
 

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Not surprising - most of them are simply worthless when it gets slightly slick. When we get bad ice storms I park the subie and we just drive the wife's Highlander with studs - or we simply stay home. When the chain law is in effect in town, it's time for movies and popcorn.
:lol:

Ya, we don't get anything like that here. What we see is pretty minimal compared to some parts of the country. I was stoked to get 2' of snow at my house. That was the most we have seen in several years.

Of course our snow removal equipment is terribly lacking, so what started out as fun ended up being 3" deep ruts for ~ a month. That was kinda irritating. I would like the opportunity to go out in a situation like what you describe, just to experience it. I have driven on some sheets of ice before, but not like the ice storms in the NE.
 

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i oppted for the nokian WRplus, decent dry handeling ( soft side walls suck lol ), excellent wet handeling, as for snow ill have to wait till the white stuff hits the ground.

donnie
My Nokian WR XL's snow rated all seasons did a fine job of getting me through last winter, and are good for daily driving especially in the wet. They would be lousy to auto-x on.
 

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...I would like the opportunity to go out in a situation like what you describe, just to experience it...
Unh, unh, no you wouldn't! What I'm talking about is when you have to crawl to get to your car. I kid you not - you can't even stand up without falling on your ass.

Here's what it looked like last year in Portland, and it was much worse on our side of the hill: YouTube - Portland Ice Storm
 

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Unh, unh, no you wouldn't! What I'm talking about is when you have to crawl to get to your car. I kid you not - you can't even stand up without falling on your ass.

Here's what it looked like last year in Portland, and it was much worse on our side of the hill: YouTube - Portland Ice Storm
I was near portland when that happened. That was fun. I'm not saying I would want that to be something I see regularly. But to see it one time, I would even throw on some spikes for walking around. I can't imagine a much more fun surface to drive on.
 

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There are winter tires and there are snow tires. You do not need snow tires unless you live in an area where there is snow on the road all winter long. Winter tires have a softer rubber compound to deal with the colder temps which is the most important featire of a winter tire. They will also have a tread pattern to deal with snow much better than an all-season. People buy these cars and think they have a rally car so they go buy a true snow tire for all the wrong reasons. I am guessing most cars will see 95% pavement during the winter season.

I made my decision based on dry performance of a winter tire. The Dunlop M3s still have solid performance characteristics for a winter tire and are more than enough to deal with snow.
 
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