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2 cans of large capacity with tangential inlets
swirl inducer ring
valved drains to act as aos OR catchcan
spill free fittings for the coolant so it can be heated or not.
serviceable

its not exactly a long list


The moroso setup is really close to your list, just without the ability to be heated. I find that waiting 10 minutes or so after shutting the car down allows enough heat from the turbo to sufficiently heat the cans and allow all gunk to run out.
turbo blanket dosent even get hot in the winter, also moroso only ticks 1.5 boxes: 2 cans with valved drains
 

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Is the o-ring sitting in a counterbore only? No o-ring groove? That could certainly explain it, but I'd be surprised if the low vacuum would be enough to dislodge the ring. Possible I suppose.



Weed, the problem is no one has the same checkboxes... Do you want it to look cool? Function? Be easy to install? Inexpensive? VTA? Catch or drain? Maintenance free? Heated?... The list goes on.

Here is ours if you haven't seen it. It checks the function & performance boxes first and foremost, as I have always been a function first kind of guy, and was not satisfied (and had been coerced by the market) with the capabilities of the market offerings. Does this hit everyone's checkboxes? Highly doubtful, but it definitely performs to it's purpose.

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I was checking this out on your website and wanted to confirm a couple things. Is the GR AOS for the GR chassis only? I see the FA20 AOS as well and just wanted to make sure how specific each design was.

Also, I see your site mention that there's no need for coolant lines running through the AOS. IAG's reasoning is to prevent the condensation build up inside the AOS from making it's way into the crankcase. How does your AOS not get the same condensation? I'm concerned about it because I DD and track this car in northeast Ohio.
 

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yes it is a good design, but you seem to agree with me that it will not serve daily drivers of cold climates. the crawford will always let the gunk out because the design dosent let the can drain until you shut the car off
Also, I see your site mention that there's no need for coolant lines running through the AOS. IAG's reasoning is to prevent the condensation build up inside the AOS from making it's way into the crankcase. How does your AOS not get the same condensation? I'm concerned about it because I DD and track this car in northeast Ohio.
These are great questions/concerns, and we get them often so it may be time to address it in the product's description.

For over a year we daily drove three shop cars. These cars ranged from stock to built (760whp). This was our own alpha testing. Our AOS is made to come apart very easily and our recommendation is to check and clean if necessary at every oil change. You might find there is a little stuff stuck to the sides or more. It's going to depend on your environment, fuel, how you drive, etc... Essentially everyone has different results and until you know about how much accumulates, it's better to check it. In our testing I cleaned one of the units once. Not that it had enough accumulation to effect performance of the unit, but I wanted to see how easy it would be to clean. removing and replacing the top takes a couple of minutes and no hoses need to be removed.

One thing you will find... even with heated units, is that the lines still form an accumulation. So even a heated unit is not immune to the goo. Anyone that tells you otherwise either doesn't have the experience or is just feeding BS. The OEM hard metal crossover tube (in front of the intercooler) is the worst culprit, but we even see this build up in the oil fill tube, which doesn't even have 'flow'.





I was checking this out on your website and wanted to confirm a couple things. Is the GR AOS for the GR chassis only? I see the FA20 AOS as well and just wanted to make sure how specific each design was.
The EJ and FA have different PCV setups as far as venting, hose sizes, etc., so the designs are model specific. The GD and GR are the same unit, but with different mounting brackets.

Weed, why do you want two units or large capacity? For a swirl pot design like ours, the rapid rotary flow is a major player with the unit's efficiency. We played with different geometry to find the sweet spot for best efficiency (given the payload we were looking to loose) and bigger would not be what I would recommend based on our own findings. Maybe a different setup it might make sense, and I see huge HP guys using bigger units, but they are mostly compensating for the engines spewing gross amounts of oil out the vents for various other reasons.

The old dual Crawford setup that was on some race setups and the Gymkhana cars I believe were done that way to cope with the single unit not being sufficient. Keep in mind, before our venture into these products, were proponents of those units... and our goal was not to just be as good. They didn't perform bad, and are fine for most applications. The above applications being a bit beyond their single unit's capabilities.
 

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Weed, why do you want two units or large capacity? For a swirl pot design like ours, the rapid rotary flow is a major player with the unit's efficiency. We played with different geometry to find the sweet spot for best efficiency (given the payload we were looking to loose) and bigger would not be what I would recommend based on our own findings.
because this is not a static flow type of situation, most of the time there will not be enough velocity to cause any swirl pot effect, and the pulse type flow is not great for inducing the swirl effect. this means most of the time we are relying on volumetric separation in low-mid engine speed situations. swirl pot efficiency has more to do with diameter than length in a cylindrical application, meaning we can increase volume without decreasing efficiency. this is all a moot point if the drain line is subject to any flow as it will disrupt the cyclone and blow the separated gunk straight up towards the outlet.

first picture here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclonic_separation shows good design.

below is a video of a well designed cyclonic separator, you will notice the "dirty" return is below the liquid level to isolate gas and liquid flow, the cyclone actually reaches down the drain line to the "float level" of the liquid, and the unit never fully drains until flow is stopped. this unit also happens to be vacuum operated unlike many industrial designs which are positive pressure operated. demonstration begins ~1:00 in
https://youtu.be/kkOr2ycxAGQ
 

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^ you need to put that theory to the test someday. I'd like to see what you come up with. More products on the market definitely makes for better products on the market, and I do love to be competitive :)

In case it wasn't noted before, our unit is vacuum operated under boost, and has features to promote flow around the outside of the 'pot'. The drain is also baffled to prevent any accumulation from being blown upwards disrupting flow, or worse, putting fluid droplets back into the vented flow that's heading to the outlet. That would be bad. The conical shape also provides varying velocities and centrifugal forces. I've found this makes the unit more efficient across flow ranges and with varying degrees (sizes and types) of vapors suspended in the blowby gasses.

I'm sure someone could make a better mousetrap, I'm not saying that's not possible. IMO, we've put way more testing, design, and engineering into this unit than anyone has before. The road to release has been a long one as I wanted to be very sure it lived up to it's name of 'separator' in a way that's not to disappoint. As more units ship and reviews start coming, time will tell if we've accomplished that. I hope we have... at least until the next best thing comes along :)
 

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^ you need to put that theory to the test someday. I'd like to see what you come up with. More products on the market definitely makes for better products on the market, and I do love to be competitive :)

In case it wasn't noted before, our unit is vacuum operated under boost, and has features to promote flow around the outside of the 'pot'. The drain is also baffled to prevent any accumulation from being blown upwards disrupting flow, or worse, putting fluid droplets back into the vented flow that's heading to the outlet. That would be bad. The conical shape also provides varying velocities and centrifugal forces. I've found this makes the unit more efficient across flow ranges and with varying degrees (sizes and types) of vapors suspended in the blowby gasses.

I'm sure someone could make a better mousetrap, I'm not saying that's not possible. IMO, we've put way more testing, design, and engineering into this unit than anyone has before. The road to release has been a long one as I wanted to be very sure it lived up to it's name of 'separator' in a way that's not to disappoint. As more units ship and reviews start coming, time will tell if we've accomplished that. I hope we have... at least until the next best thing comes along :)
to be clear i do think your product is better than any other single offering, if i was starting this journey down the rabbit hole today i would buy your unit. i think the FA20 model could very well be used as a head breather only option for the EJ motors, maybe think about a bracket setup for that. i put a fumoto valve on the drain of my vibrant can so maybe that could be an option for yours as well. have you ever run the drain line to a catch tank so see how much separating is happening? seems like people love seeing that.

as for bringing something to market i doubt that will ever happen, i was in manufacturing for 15 years and shall not return. bloody nightmare of an industry but it taught me a lot and i got to play with a lot of multi million dollar toys and work with hundreds of very talented engineers. like i said i need to get myself a tig, learn how to use it, then i can build what i want. making a cone is going to suck.
 

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have you ever run the drain line to a catch tank so see how much separating is happening? seems like people love seeing that.
No I haven't. I agree, people like seeing that kind of thing, but testing functionality of the unit means nothing is coming out of it, and it's pulling crankcase vacuum. That was our criteria. Drain back in this configuration is pretty straightforward function wise, unless you do something moronic with the design. Depending on the application, you can definitely gets slugs of oil going through it so measuring accumulation would not be a decent representation of what everyone can expect IMO.

as for bringing something to market i doubt that will ever happen, i was in manufacturing for 15 years and shall not return. bloody nightmare of an industry but it taught me a lot and i got to play with a lot of multi million dollar toys and work with hundreds of very talented engineers. like i said i need to get myself a tig, learn how to use it, then i can build what i want. making a cone is going to suck.
15 for me as well designing custom automation and manufacturing processes; medical, laser, advanced ceramics, military, and even automotive OEMs. Was cool having super huge budgets and near unlimited R&D budgets. I do miss that.

making a cone is going to suck.
They can be sourced; cast and formed, but not really what I'd call cheap. I don't recommend doing it the way we do from a solid +6" piece of billet aluminum bar. For one piece, that would cost a small fortune!
 

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it's alu-min-ium (best top gear voice)

i just noticed the killer b unit looks like a bee hive, kinda wanna dub it the honey pot
I think it's al-U-min-E-um... although after you said Top Gear I heard May say it :lol:

Hmmmm... Honey Pot... I like that :tup:
 

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Here's one of the Porsche versions. There is a 'horn' version too that is known to not work as well... and a few other variants made to work with the scavenge setup.



The nicer M-series BMWs have a conical version. They are known to clog when not maintained, but they are not scavenge, they are PCV system.
 

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Here, I found the M-Series BMW AOS. I thought I tossed it. I think this came out of a turbo V8. I want to say 8 series, but it was years ago, so I could be wrong...

 

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Here's one of the Porsche versions. There is a 'horn' version too that is known to not work as well... and a few other variants made to work with the scavenge setup.

Image Link


The nicer M-series BMWs have a conical version. They are known to clog when not maintained, but they are not scavenge, they are PCV system.
Any info on the connectors used on this system? seems most VAG cars use these and maybe newer fords also https://sep.yimg.com/ay/yhst-37354654005614/ford-oem-pvc-snap-fitting-90-angle-for-oil-catch-can-14.png

is there an industry standard name for these?
 

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Anyone have any updates on data/function of the Radium Engineering AOS? Pretty much have it narrowed down to IAG Comp series and the Radium unit
 

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Any info on the connectors used on this system? seems most VAG cars use these and maybe newer fords also https://sep.yimg.com/ay/yhst-37354654005614/ford-oem-pvc-snap-fitting-90-angle-for-oil-catch-can-14.png

is there an industry standard name for these?
Can you get a smaller pic? I can almost make out what that is :lol: I'm old, you need to upsize that pic for us senior types ;)

The Porsche and BMW fittings look to be mostly barb and o-rings. Nothing magical. We use a modified barb/vacuum/push lock fitting design.
 
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