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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This was originally a guide to common quirks and noises that STi's and other turbo cars make. I've now begun to develop it into a comprehensive guide for the new STi owner. It includes all the things that more experienced STi owners know well, but that new owners would have to hunt down and get flamed for asking about. Feel free to post suggestions and corrections. I want this to be as accurate and comprehensive as possible. Enjoy :)

*Note: All information below applies to a stock STi. If you have modified your car I cannot promise that everything contained in this thread will apply to your vehicle.

**Update: I created this thread as a guide to the GD STi. I know very little about the GR models (08-10) and so some of this information may not apply to those vehicles. I've PM'd a moderator requesting it be moved back to the GD General forum. Until then, and assuming that does not happen, I am researching the GR models and will update this thread appropriately when I am confident all my information for those cars is correct. Until then, I apologize for the confusion.


Basic Maintenance Information


Fluid Requirements

Gasoline - 91 or 93 octane. Use the highest grade available in your area

Engine Oil - 4.8qt of 5W-30 synthetic oil.

Transmission Oil - 4.1qt of 75W90 synthetic gear oil (if you have grinding after doing this, as some people do, try 80W-90 non-synthetic)

Rear Differential Oil - ~1qt of Subaru LSD fluid (for 2007 owners, you need to use regular 75W-90 with no LSD additive)

Coolant - Any ethylene-glycol coolant that is marked as safe for aluminum radiators.

Brake Fluid - ~1 bottle of DOT3, DOT4, or DOT5.1 brake fluid

Clutch Fluid -
~1 bottle of DOT 4 or DOT5.1 brake fluid

Power Steering Fluid - Subaru's automatic transmission fluid.

*Note - My suggestions on some fluids are not the only things you can use. You can use DOT 5 (or any DOT fluid, in theory) for the hydraulics as long as you fully flush the lines, as DOT5 WILL NOT MIX. I do not, however, recommend this. DOT5 is silicone based and will aerate when the ABS activates. This can cause brake failure. Any 75W-90 gear oil will work for the transmission, but synthetic WILL make it chatter horribly. This has happened to me and several others. Semi-synthetic does, however, work wonderfully for the tranny. You may also use any 90W-90 gear oil in the rear differential, provided it has a Limited Slip additive (04-06 ONLY).


Filters

Air Filter - Get a reusable filter from K&N, HKS, or an equivalent company.

Oil Filter - OEM Subaru Blue Filters, NOT a Fram

Fuel Filter -
OEM only


Basic Torque Specs

Engine Oil Pan - 32.5lb/ft

Transmission Plug (Clutch Side) - 51lb/ft

Transmission Plug (Oil Pan Side) - 32.5lb/ft

Spark Plugs - 15 lb/ft or hand tight + about 1/4 turn if your torque wrench won't fit in there. Always use anti-seize tape or cream.



Change Intervals


Engine Oil - 3,750 miles, but mechanics say 3,000 miles is better for the turbo, which is true (2,500 miles if you have a larger than stock turbo)

Transmission Oil -
30,000 miles

Front Differential Oil -
Feeds off of transmission pan (convenient, eh?)

Rear Differential Oil -
30,000 miles

Spark Plugs -
10,000 miles for copper; 50,000 miles for platinum/iridium

Brake Fluid -
Inspect/Bleed every 15,000 miles; change every 30,000 miles (more often for tracked cars)

Clutch Fluid -
Inspect/Bleed every 15,000 miles; change as needed

Timing Belt -
100,000 miles; 90,000 if you live in a hot area

*
All intervals are directly from Subaru except for spark plugs and alternative timing belt interval.

Miscellaneous



Spark Plug Gapping - recommended for stock heat range is .028-.031. The closer to .028, the happier your engine will be.

Tire Rotation Pattern - Swap the tires from front to back, back to front, staying on their original sides of the car. So the driver's side front and rears change places, and the passenger side front and rears change places.

Where Your Jack Goes - On the front of the car, you use the jacking plate. If you're confused as to what that is, it's the plate that the back of the front undertray attaches to with 2 bolts. Make sure your jack is centered on the plate and don't fret if it gets a little bent up. It won't hurt anything and a new one is only about $20.

On the rear of the car, the jack goes under your rear differential. I know that sounds crazy, but the service manual says so. That thing can hold a lot of weight. However, the jack needs to be behind the seam in the differential, or else you can break the housing and/or bolts. You may also want to put a block of 2x4 or a hockey puck in the jack dish to prevent damage to the housing, though this has yet to happen to me.

Where Your Jackstands Go - As crazy as it sounds, you should use the factory pinch welds. They're the best spots I've found. However, if you don't like this or don't trust yourself to be gentle enough to keep them from bending, you can place the front stands on the subframe. The rear stands need to go on the pinch welds, always. There is a spot in the rear, near the differential outriggers, that some people like to use, but it can make you car creak terribly. I speak from experience on this. :( The trick is just to lower the car GENTLY onto the stands when using the pinch welds. They won't bend if you're careful. You can avoid contacting the welds themselves by using jack stands with deep grooves in the center, like mine. These contact only the reinforced supports on the sides of the pinches, and not the welds themselves.




Basic Safety

AWD Invincibility -
I can't even count the number of wrecks that are caused by the idea that 4WD or AWD makes your car invincible on ice or wet ground. It's actually no better than FWD or RWD once you completely lose traction. Having four wheels spinning only gives you a better chance of keeping traction with your drive wheels. Be smart; don't drive fast when it's wet or icy outside.

Stock Tires - The stock Bridgestone RE070 tires are amazing...in the summer. If they see any cold weather or slick/wet conditions, you might as well call the wrecker before you leave the house. Some people seem to make these tires work in adverse weather by driving slowly, but I do the same thing and mine never
stick unless it's dry out :confused:

High-Speed Handling - Yes, you now own a performance car. It can probably go a lot faster than your last ride and can take turns much faster and harder. That does not, however, mean it doesn't have limits. The STi has funky handling at high speeds. Above ~50mph, my experience has been that at light throttle or locked DCCD, the car will understeer like a pig. But if you get on the gas, your rear end will break loose into oversteer. It doesn't do either of these noticeably at any lower speeds.
*You can fix both of the above problems with some suspension mods. It's worth it if you intend to autocross.



Things You May Not Recognize

DCCD -
This is the little dial and switch on your center console. Click the switch to activate manual mode (click again to return to auto). Turning the dial while in manual mode
varies the center differential's degree of locking. The higher the level of lock, the less the center differential will slip its clutch pack. There is a very good in-depth explanation here
.

Boost Gauge - This one seems like a no-brainer, but the STi is some people's first turbocharged car. This gauge (if installed) will be mounted on your steering column and will display pressure in Bar, Psi, or Hg. This is an indicator of how much pressure, or boost, your turbocharger is producing. Unless you plan on modifying and tuning the car, it's really just for fun. However, if you notice it rising beyond about 15psi on a stock car, you need to get the car checked, as you've likely just overboosted. For those without this gauge, don't worry about if overboosting and not being able to tell. It'll trip a CEL with or without the gauge.

Intercooler - Again, this will only be new to you if it's your first turbo car. This is the giant radiator-like device sitting on top of your engine (or in your front bumper, if your car has an aftermarket FMIC). In fact, it actually is a type of radiator. But instead of cooling down your engine, it cools down the air flowing from the turbocharger into your engine. This allows the air charge to become more dense and therefore more air can fit into each cylinder. This equates to more power :tup:

"I/C Water Spray" Button - This does exactly what it says: it sprays your intercooler with water. This is useful because the STi's intercooler is placed above the engine, which causes heat soak, reducing its efficiency. Heat soak is when the heat radiating from the engine bay soaks into the intercooler, warming it up and, consequently, the air passing through it. This reduces its cooling efficiency. The water spray will mitigate heat soak while it is spraying, and for a short while afterward. The tank to refill it is on the right side of your trunk. Use distilled water so as not to clog the lines up. Don't worry about accidentally running it dry; there is a friendly orange warning light that says "I/C Spray" directly beneath the tachometer that will light up when you are running low.

The Hole Next to the E-Brake (MY 2004 only) - Sadly, that's a cup holder. Subaru didn't realize that people might want to have drinks in their cars, and so put in one medium sized cup holder that conveniently drips your beverage onto your stereo deck, and bored out a hole for half of a soda can next to the e-brake. And if your rear passengers have drinks, you better make sure they have a tight grip, as the back is devoid of cupholders entirely. I know it's annoying, but the only way to fix it is to swap for a 2005+ interior, which is possible, but it's no easy feat. :mad:




Common Issues



Noises


Strut Clunk - The infamous "Strut Clunk" of the 2004-2007 models is easily the most common noise. It happens primarily in the rear of the car but did eventually start happening on my fronts after 70,000 miles. You'll notice a sort of hollow knocking when you're driving the car that gets worse over rough surfaces. It's due to poor lubrication of the stock struts and doesn't mean you need new struts or that anything is broken. You just need to add a little grease. Here's the How-To

Differential Binding - Another common and well documented noise is the Differential Bind. This isn't just a noise, but also a really rough jerking sensation when the car is at low speeds, particularly while turning. You'll notice it when your DCCD is in anything but "Auto" or the very last green setting, also called Open. If this happens, just flip the switch back to Auto and you should be fine. In other words, only use settings beyond Open or Auto above about 20mph.

Turbo Spool - This will manifest itself as a whining sounds while you're accelerating. If this is your first turbo car, don't be surprised by it. It's completely normal and is actually kind of cool to hear once you're used to it. This is the turbocharger spinning up to operating speeds, or "spooling". It becomes particularly noticeable with a new air filter, aftermarket downpipe, or an Intake Silencer delete. I've also been told that it gets louder when installing a new turbo inlet hose or FMIC, but I can't confirm these, as I have neither.

BPV/BOV Hiss - If you hear a "psh" noise when releasing the gas pedal after accelerating or when shifting, it's normal. Again, don't be surprised by this if it's your first turbocharged car. They all do this and it's normal. This is the bypass valve (or blow-off valve, if installed) releasing excess air pressure into the atmosphere (BOV) or back into your intake track (BPV).

Mirror Howl - At speeds above 100mph (+-10mph depending on wind) you may start to hear a loud howling noise. It resembles the noise an open chimney makes in a storm. It has something to do with the airflow around your side mirrors. The way I fix it is to fold them in while at the track/drag strip, as they're not needed there.

Other - You own an STi now, and you're going to have to live with the fact that they're noisy. There isn't too much sound deadening material, so you may think a lot is wrong with your car that isn't. The fact is, your STi is just a noisy little bugger. Most things you hear while driving are nothing to worry about :) You can fix this by adding sound deadening material to the firewall and behind the door "cards" (blue, cloth covered plastic inserts in the doors).


Misleading Error Codes

Cam Timing Advancement CEL -
This happened to me twice before I solved it. Subaru has put out a service bulletin on it, and it's not actually jumping timing as the code suggests. It's caused by two poorly designed mesh filters interfering with your oil flow and cam position sensors. You can correct this in your garage. Follow the How-To I link to, change your oil, and the light will be gone. How to fix it. If this doesn't work, you may have actually jumped timing or have an ECU fault. Get it checked right away if this is the case. If your timing belt is failing you can wind up with some seriously messed up valves, and that's no cheap fix.


Miscellaneous Quirks

"Oh S***, I Think My CEL Just Flashed" - No it didn't. CEL's light and stay lit until the problem is resolved. What you probably just saw in your peripheral vision is the I/C spray warning. It just means your intercooler spray tank needs to be refilled. Going over a bump will sometimes cause this light to flash briefly, then disappear when the contents of the tank settle.

"Notchy" Shifter -
It's well known that the STi has a stiff shifter, especially if you have the SPT or another short-throw shifter. Nothing is wrong with your transmission and it's completely normal to have trouble getting it into 1st from anything but a standstill. My 2004 STi is this way, as is my buddy's 2010 STi SE, and his car only has 1200 miles on it.

Paint Chips and Scratches Easily - This is another manufacturer fault. For some reason, Subaru thought it'd be funny to paint our cars with water colors. The paint is very, very prone to chipping, scratching, and fading. If this bothers you, you can get it repainted for anywhere between $2000-$5000 at a good body shop.

"My Steering Feels Like Pudding" - This, in my opinion, was the 2004-2007 STi's greatest failure. The steering has no solid neutral feel and is almost messy sometimes. Thankfully, there's an easy fix for this. They're called steering bushings and will run you $30. They may take you up to an hour to install, but it's more than worth it. It's a cheap mod for your car that will produce some great results.

Gas tank only fills to 3/4 full - This seems to be a common problem with all Imprezas, STi or not. I've seen it attributed to faulty OEM fuel level sensors, and I'm not sure if that is the case or not. I do know that by setting the clicker on the gas pump's nozzle to the lowest notch (slowest fuel flow), you can get the tank to fill to 90-95% full. You can also top the tank off by continuing to hold the handle after it shuts off automatically, but I DO NOT advise that you do this. In the event your tank actually is full and you "top off", you can damage your EES (Evaporative Emissions System), which can cause CELs and no end of trouble.

Car Beeps Loudly Near Redline - I'll admit, this scared the crap out of me the first time I really put my foot down. It's not an alarm, it's your shift light/beeper. There is a red light in the center of your tachometer that flashes at an RPM level you set to allow for optimal acceleration (in theory). It has a beeper you can toggle on and off and it'll likely scare you if you're not expecting it. Check your owner's manual for instructions on how to disable it.

Power Gain After Routine Maintenance - This can be one of the more exciting things that will happen with your STi. Example: You install a new battery and suddenly you feel like you've gained 30hp. It's because you have. While the 30hp is an exaggeration, your car has become more powerful, at least temporarily. Disconnecting the negative terminal of the battery for a while resets the ECU and it's DAM (Dynamic Advance Multiplier). The DAM corrects for knocking in your engine. Its default value may provide more power than what your ECU had it previously set at, though it increases the risk of your engine knocking. After a little driving (~200 miles), your power will most likely settle to whatever it was at previously as the ECU relearns your driving style. If this doesn't happen, then something you've done has reduced the potential for knock and caused the DAM to become less restrictive.

Sudden Drop in Fuel Economy - This is another common thing with turbocharged cars. In naturally aspirated or supercharged cars, fuel economy tends to increase steadily as you approach peak torque, and decreases in a roughly linear manner above or below this point. On turbocharged cars, fuel economy increases in the same fashion until you hit the point at which the turbocharger produces usable boost. At this point, your fuel consumption will skyrocket. The reason for this is that your engine is suddenly receiving a much larger air flow, and consequently ingests more fuel. This results in higher fuel consumption, meaning worse fuel economy. If you tend to drive spiritedly and stay in boost a lot, you're going to get much, much worse fuel economy compared to fuel economy in NA or supercharged cars when looking at fuel economy vs driving style. According to people who have posted in here, your best fuel economy occurs at ~3,800-4,000RPM. Ironically, this is just below where the stock STi will begin to produce usable boost at medium to heavy throttle, so you have a fine line between great (for the STi) gas mileage and extremely high fuel consumption.

"The Daytime Running Lights Won't Turn Off, They're Killing My Battery!"- This one is easy to fix. There is a switch on top of your steering column;turn it off to disable your parking lights. This will not disable your normal DRL's, even though they use the same bulb. This just allows them to shut off when the car does, rather than staying on. I do not have any idea what purpose this switch serves, since all it does is leave your lights on when the car is off, draining your battery. There is absolutely no harm in leaving it off, and I recommend that you do so to save yourself from having to ask your neighbor for a jump every morning ;)

Vanishing Oil - Again, this is something that is totally normal for an STi, while it would be a concern on many other cars. You may be a quart or two short at every oil change, and it's fairly common. It is largely a result of blow-by and an inadequate Positive Crankcase Ventilation, or PCV, system. However, you should still check your oil at every fill-up, just in case you are running low or losing more than usual.



Tips for the Beginning Modder

This is a short little list of some first steps for those of you looking to mod your car. It also includes some common errors to avoid. Remember, the turbocharger makes modding this car completely different from an NA car.

  • Get an Accessport. It's a great, basic ECU tool and you should flash to the OTS Stage 1 map for better power and fuel economy.
  • Grab a nice TBE, but don't throw on the downpipe without a tune or Stage 2 flash. It can cause boost creep and kill your engine if you don't.
  • Get a boost gauge before you start tuning if you don't already have one.
  • ALWAYS re-tune your car when you mess with anything related to the engine (air flow, fuel flow, exhaust). The STi is very, very, very sensitive and has to be properly tuned if you don't want things to start blowing up (usually not literally ;))
  • Don't get a BOV without knowing what they really do and how they can actually affect your performance. Your stock BPV is good up to ~20psi, depending on other factors. However, if you're hell-bent on getting a BOV for that air gun noise, get a 3-bar or greater MAP sensor and have your car set up for MAP use. It'll keep you from running richer than usual between shifts and it's an overall better air measurement system. Blow-through MAF is another alternative for using BOV's.
  • Don't bother with an intake until you get a bigger turbo. You will most likely not gain anything noticeable until you have a turbo that wants more air. The stock system is actually quite adequate.
  • If you're confused about what to modify in what order when going for big power, remember this: let the turbo's capabilities be your limiting factor, not its supporting mods. Build your car to handle the turbo you want, starting from the bottom up. Get an exhaust to handle your ideal turbo, then an intake tract/intercooler for said turbo, then a fuel system, then engine internals if necessary, and only after all that, your new turbo. Each of the supporting mods will net small gains on a stock turbo, plus they will allow your new turbo to perform to the extent of its abilities once installed. Having a "bottlenecked" turbo will do about as much good as the supporting mods will on a stock turbo, so it's easier and smarter to do the turbo last.
  • If you're not sure you can put it back together, DON'T TAKE IT APART. This applies to everything under your hood, and I mean everything. Some cars can run fine with half of their parts missing (any LS1-powered car), but your STi is not one of them. These cars are very sensitive to change and have very little tolerance for improper part installation or untuned modifications.
* Special thanks to Peaty of Scoobymods.com, as well as snorky and Jesse from IWSTI for the How-To's I've linked to in this thread. Thanks as well to everyone who has posted here in an attempt to make this as accurate as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

HTML:
subscribed . Finally an all in one thread about our common issues :)
Thanks :) I plan on expanding this later to include fluid specifications, a few basic torque specs, and other things a new owner would want, but would normally have to search for.
 

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Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

Great idea! I'd add in some info about the DCCD too. :tup:
 

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Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

  • Sudden Drop in Fuel Economy - This is another common thing with turbocharged cars. In naturally aspirated or supercharged cars, fuel consumption tends to increase steadily as your average RPM level increases. On turbocharged cars, however, fuel economy increases in this linear fashion until you hit the point at which the turbocharger produces usable boost. At this point, your fuel consumption will skyrocket. The reason for this is that your engine is suddenly receiving a much larger air flow, and consequently adds more fuel. This results in higher fuel consumption. If you tend to drive spiritedly and stay in boost a lot, you're going to get much, much worse fuel economy compared to fuel economy in NA or supercharged cars when looking at fuel economy vs driving style.

No kidding, that explains something I didn't understand with the STi - and was not aware of for Turbo/NA cars. But really makes sense once you think about it. But I've actually noticed the improved mileage as RPM increases, but staying off boost.

I noticed that on long trips - if I averaged 90-100mph, I would get much much better fuel milage than if I cruised at 70-80mph - all while in 6th. It seems the STi makes the best milage @ 4,000rpm by my calcs.

I'd get around 20-24mpg @ 80 vs. 28-30mpg @ 95mph. (can't condone those speeds all the time, but when driving long trips through the middle of Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, and Nerbraska, nobody is around).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

No kidding, that explains something I didn't understand with the STi - and was not aware of for Turbo/NA cars. But really makes sense once you think about it. But I've actually noticed the improved mileage as RPM increases, but staying off boost.

I noticed that on long trips - if I averaged 90-100mph, I would get much much better fuel milage than if I cruised at 70-80mph - all while in 6th. It seems the STi makes the best milage @ 4,000rpm by my calcs.

I'd get around 20-24mpg @ 80 vs. 28-30mpg @ 95mph. (can't condone those speeds all the time, but when driving long trips through the middle of Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, and Nerbraska, nobody is around).
Yeah, I wasn't thinking about that. 4000rpm is just before boost hits in a stock car. And yes, that will increase your mileage by driving as close to that as possible. That's my mistake. It does that because the turbo is essentially recycling energy, meaning there is less work for the engine to do, which equates to better fuel economy. There are other factors, like fuel trim, but the turbo is a big part of it. I'll edit the post to reflect this :)
 

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Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

I'll edit the post to reflect this :)
Don't think you need to it already says that:

"On turbocharged cars, however, fuel economy increases in this linear fashion until you hit the point at which the turbocharger produces usable boost." :)
 

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Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

Sooo, what does it mean if the differential binds when in "auto"....? lol
 

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Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

  • Car Beeps Loudly Near Redline - I'll admit, this scared the crap out of me the first time I really put my foot down. It's not an alarm, it's your shift light/beeper. There is a red light in the center of your tachometer that flashes at an RPM level you set to allow for optimal acceleration (in theory). It has a beeper you can toggle on and off and it'll likely scare you if you're not expecting it. Check your owner's manual for instructions on how to disable it.
This scared the **** out of me when I went WOT after my car being tuned after being ripped apart for 2 months :lol:
 

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Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

Sooo, what does it mean if the differential binds when in "auto"....? lol
First, I'd try changing your gear oil and rear diff. oil. If that doesn't help, you probably should head to a mechanic. I've never heard of it binding in Auto.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

Don't think you need to it already says that:

"On turbocharged cars, however, fuel economy increases in this linear fashion until you hit the point at which the turbocharger produces usable boost." :)
No, I meant the part about your fuel economy increasing up until boost hits. I didn't have that in there. Thanks for bringing that to my attention :)

*Edit - Wow, I typo'd and accidentally posted correct information. Not only that, but I misread my own post twice. Please excuse my stupidity :p
 

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Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

Changed the diff oil 2 weeks ago. Doing trans next weekend. Replacing with motul fluids. I really only have the problem on one turn every morning on my way to work. Its at low speeds and is an uphill right-hander. Fairly tight too. The bind is not dramatic, well some days more than others. Sometimes none at all. But it bothers the hell outta me. Im in "auto" all the time unless I require using the DCCD.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

Changed the diff oil 2 weeks ago. Doing trans next weekend. Replacing with motul fluids. I really only have the problem on one turn every morning on my way to work. Its at low speeds and is an uphill right-hander. Fairly tight too. The bind is not dramatic, well some days more than others. Sometimes none at all. But it bothers the hell outta me. Im in "auto" all the time unless I require using the DCCD.
On second thought, don't worry about it. The details you gave tell me a lot. On that turn your transmission, engine, and differential are under their maximum loads, since you're turning, accelerating, and driving uphill. Try setting the DCCD to fully open on that turn. If that doesn't work, ask a transmission shop about it. There's a small chance it could be a problem, but I doubt it, considering the conditions it occurs under.

Also, good call on the Motul fluids. I'm more of a Redline fan, but your driveline will be well-protected. You can never be too careful :)
 

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Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

On second thought, don't worry about it. The details you gave tell me a lot. On that turn your transmission, engine, and differential are under their maximum loads, since you're turning, accelerating, and driving uphill. Try setting the DCCD to fully open on that turn. If that doesn't work, ask a transmission shop about it. There's a small chance it could be a problem, but I doubt it, considering the conditions it occurs under.

Also, good call on the Motul fluids. I'm more of a Redline fan, but your driveline will be well-protected. You can never be too careful :)
Thanks man, it's been worrying me. I'm going to try what you said on Monday. It makes since that under load it could cause this. Also the fact that this really only happens on one particular turn. My biggest fear is the trans shop telling me its f'd and I gotta write a fat check. :( haha

So far the Suby is lovin the Motul fluids. Redline was gonna be my next choice. So no discrimination here, lol :tup:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

Thanks man, it's been worrying me. I'm going to try what you said on Monday. It makes since that under load it could cause this. Also the fact that this really only happens on one particular turn. My biggest fear is the trans shop telling me its f'd and I gotta write a fat check. :( haha

So far the Suby is lovin the Motul fluids. Redline was gonna be my next choice. So no discrimination here, lol :tup:
Let me know how it does on full Open. Even if it still binds a bit, it's probably no big deal. If it gets worse or happens on more than just that one turn I'd take it in, otherwise I'd leave it. And believe me, I feel your pain on writing a check to a transmission shop. I just spent a good $300 getting mine repaired :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

Great idea! I'd add in some info about the DCCD too. :tup:
Done. Along with some other major additions :)

Can anyone give me some info on what kind of power steering fluid to use and what amount? It's the only major fluid I'm missing and I don't want to guess at it and wind up damaging someone's car.
 

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Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

Changed the diff oil 2 weeks ago. Doing trans next weekend. Replacing with motul fluids. I really only have the problem on one turn every morning on my way to work. Its at low speeds and is an uphill right-hander. Fairly tight too. The bind is not dramatic, well some days more than others. Sometimes none at all. But it bothers the hell outta me. Im in "auto" all the time unless I require using the DCCD.
How many miles are on the car/last time since you changed the diff fluid?
 

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Re: The Comprehensive Guide to Your New STi - Things you should know

Someone on here did an oil filter analysis a while ago. The conclusion what to go with OEM filters or purolator brand filters. They have the most filtering surface area or something like that.

Add a basic safety section:
-Add that under 40* F the factory tires are like driving on steel drums.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Re: The Comprehensive Guide to Your New STi - Things you should know

Someone on here did an oil filter analysis a while ago. The conclusion what to go with OEM filters or purolator brand filters. They have the most filtering surface area or something like that.

Add a basic safety section:
-Add that under 40* F the factory tires are like driving on steel drums.
If you can link me to that oil filter thread, I'll alter the post to reflect that if the original poster has data for his claim.

And I'll definitely add the safety section later on. Your analogy was a little off though. The stockers are more like greasy steel drums :p I've had two spin outs and I don't drive fast at all, especially in the rain.
 

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Re: The New STi Owner's Guide - Things not to worry about

How many miles are on the car/last time since you changed the diff fluid?
Changed the diff fluid with motul 2 weeks ago. I replaced it right around 15000 miles since the prior change. Car has 80,000 miles on the clock
 
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