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Re: same

The car will probably have about 500 miles on it and I am trying to decide if I should change the oil before I hit the track? Should I put in Synthetic or stick to dino oil to make sure the engine breaks in properly?

Any thoughts, comments or personal experiences would be appreciated.

THANKS!

Enrique
 

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I'd agree with 4MLA1FN...500 miles is too early to actually have any fun in the STi on the track...plus I don't know if I would be that disciplined being passed by everyone on the track...The head instructor at the event I went to said that the magic number for him was 2.5k miles...that gives time for the engine to break-in properly. I went when I had 5k miles on mine, and I got an oil change just before that (dino oil)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It looks like I will be closer to 1000 miles than it thought, since I didn't take in to consideration the 200 mile drive up there. I am now also going to take another road trip this weekend just to bump up the miles.

Hopefully I can get to at least 1000 by the time I get there.

Thanks for the feedback..

Enrique
 

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change the oil jsut before youleave. Use the Subaru dino oil for at least the first 6k (my opinion).

I personally used my own "break in" period. See the other threads on break in's.
 

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Xman said:
change the oil jsut before youleave. Use the Subaru dino oil for at least the first 6k (my opinion).

I personally used my own "break in" period. See the other threads on break in's.
I think that is what I will do.

Thanks!

Enrique
 

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As for break in and oil change, keep with dino, fresh change day before, and hopefully you will have it broken in by then. Your car, your choice.

As for other preps I would highly recommend:
Good tire guage...use pressures from 42 to 48, depending on track/outside temp. Bias of higher pressure on fronts by about 2 psi.

Change brake fluid out for high temp fluid. After your 3rd or 4th heat, the brakes get a little mushy on first engagement, requiring some pumping. If you have the time, some medium level race pads would also do you well, but aren't truly needed as the stock pads work darned good.

Full tank of 93/94 octance gas that morning. Depending on length of heats, the STi burns through a tank of gas easilly before a full day of FATT. Plan on filling up again at the track (about triple the normal cost BTW) or exiting during a lull to get gas off the track.

Bring some water and a chair to sit on, and a camara for those awesome "on track" shots.

Don't sweat it when someone poking along doesn't wave you by. Or for that matter, if it is a race prepped vehicle and they still won't wave you by. Lots of egos out there, but just play it safe. As an indication, the last FATT I was at, I found it very easy to go around M3s, 911s, C5s, Rx7 turbos, and everything else on the track for that matter. Some of these folks found it hard to let me around, (disbelief that I was running a 4 cylinder were common remarks I heard after the first heat) but by the end of the day, they all understood and the "arm was out" as soon as they saw me in their mirrors. Guess I got the slow field that day!

Above all.....have fun!!!!

Scott
 

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YBnormal07 said:
As for other preps I would highly recommend:
Good tire guage...use pressures from 42 to 48, depending on track/outside temp. Bias of higher pressure on fronts by about 2 psi.
Agreed on all counts. I used a pyrometer for the first time (the insertion kind, not the infrared kind!) -- a little off since I didn't come straight in after hot laps, but useful nonetheless. I found 41LF, 43RF, 39LR, 38RR to be about right on the pyro (these are hot measurements -- don't start with these cold!). Much higher than I thought they'd be from my autocrossing, but on the other hand, I haven't used the pyrometer for the autocross.

Another thing to consider would be to borrow a torque wrench while in the pits and ensure your lugs are on tight. Do it again after a session or two. Having a wheel fall off while at speed would be really unenjoyable.

Change brake fluid out for high temp fluid. After your 3rd or 4th heat, the brakes get a little mushy on first engagement, requiring some pumping. If you have the time, some medium level race pads would also do you well, but aren't truly needed as the stock pads work darned good.
I ran 3 days with Motul 600 fluid and the stock pads using the stock tires. Four 1/2 hour sessions per day. No fade at all, no inconsistent feel. On the other hand, I have nothing to compare it to.

Full tank of 93/94 octance gas that morning. Depending on length of heats, the STi burns through a tank of gas easilly before a full day of FATT. Plan on filling up again at the track (about triple the normal cost BTW) or exiting during a lull to get gas off the track.
My first day at Spokane I managed the whole day on one tank, but the yellow light was on as I left the track. I took it really easy that day, especially in the first few sessions. Also, until the rest of your class gets up to speed, you'll be (relatively) loafing along behind them. This car is a monster on the track. The second day I started my fourth session and the yellow light came on as I entered the track. We hit fuel starvation on the fifth lap (2.5 mile course). So you want to keep an eye on the gas -- one of the other people that regularly races there says he gets gas at least once during the day, and won't let it get under 1/4 tank. I used 92 octane and have no audible pinging.

Bring some water and a chair to sit on, and a camara for those awesome "on track" shots.
Water definitely. Snack or food if it isn't provided. Camera isn't bad, but think about where you're standing, and get permission from someone if you leave the obvious areas. We had quite a stir at our event because someone decided to walk down the infield to get pictures without telling anyone.

Don't sweat it when someone poking along doesn't wave you by. Or for that matter, if it is a race prepped vehicle and they still won't wave you by. Lots of egos out there, but just play it safe. As an indication, the last FATT I was at, I found it very easy to go around M3s, 911s, C5s, Rx7 turbos, and everything else on the track for that matter. Some of these folks found it hard to let me around, (disbelief that I was running a 4 cylinder were common remarks I heard after the first heat) but by the end of the day, they all understood and the "arm was out" as soon as they saw me in their mirrors. Guess I got the slow field that day!
All the events I've been to have been BMW Club driving schools, so the egos seem mostly in check. But it can be frustrating to be behind some big 750i that won't let you by and must come from the factory without mirrors -- view it as practice in keeping your line and watching the track while keeping them in peripheral vision even though they're right in front of you (give them room in case they decided to be boneheads and stab the brakes in a turn -- it happens! Also in the earlier session, marvel at their "lines" -- occasionally I'd find myself in a weird place and realize I was following the guy in front instead of my line, and the guy in front has no clue where the line is). My first two events I was never passed, but I was in the novice group. I can guarantee a newer 911 turbo can outrun our car -- I rode in my instructors. Driver makes a huge difference as well -- of the three identical blue STi's at Spokane, mine was quite a bit faster than the other student in my class, and the instructor in his was insanely faster than me. I believe at Spokane the only car in our group that passed me was a 911 turbo. But put me in a higher class and the story would change (in the advanced group I'd be a road hazard).

Since we had 5 STi's at the track for the two-day event, it was common knowledge that the STi goes blazingly fast. The ones with troubles are the small cars that corner well but don't have much power. A friend of mine in a 1977 P-911 got really held up by the other STi which was way slower than him in the corners but would rocket away on the straight (only to be caught again by the end of the first corner). Talk about frustration. What I thought was funny is that he said on the straight he'd look in his mirror to check out the license plate of the blue STi -- if it was mine he'd give a point-by -- if not, he'd know that a point-by now would mean a slow next lap.

Also, don't worry about going fast. Drive your speed, drive smoothly, drive well, and don't have any competitions. The car is plenty fast. The number one mod that will make you go the fastest is the driver. What's cool is that that's probably the number one safety mod too!
 
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