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Looking for some pictures of fuel line routing with aftermarket rails.

I found some threads that mentioned it but the picture links have been disabled.

Does anyone have pics of how they ran the fuel lines, looking for clean practical way of running the larger lines across the bay to the FPR area..

Tks
Jim
 

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Mine run under the intake. My FPR is mounted on the EBCS bracket and the fuel filter is mounted to the driver's side of the intake, but other than that, it's largely unseen.

The hose looped near the dipstick is a fuel line.

 

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Looking for some pictures of fuel line routing with aftermarket rails.

I found some threads that mentioned it but the picture links have been disabled.

Does anyone have pics of how they ran the fuel lines, looking for clean practical way of running the larger lines across the bay to the FPR area..

Tks
Jim
If you u need bosch 044 fuel pump , i have it brand new for sale and i'm in windsor.
 

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I've cleaned up my bay quite a lot, the fuel line routing is pretty straightforward. I replaced everything out of the desire for a cleaner setup, not due to fuel delivery being a bottleneck. I plumbed everything with -6 hose, AN fittings and some OEM pinch clamps. I plumbed the system in parallel configuration. I'm using an Aeromotive FPR that I've mounted near the pitch stopper. The car makes 410whp on 93.



I did not modify the entry point of the lines into the engine compartment but I might relocate them in the future in order to further clean up the bay.

Anyhow, as far as routing goes: the supply line runs out from the LH strut tower and under the intake manifold, then "tees" under the throttle body splitting the line off to the LH and RH side rails.

Fuel flows through the rail and out the back. From each rail there is a line plumbed to the two side "in" ports on the FPR. Then, the bottom port on the FPR (return) is plumbed to the return line on the LH strut tower.

This diagram from IAG is the same as how I plumbed mine:
 

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Mine run under the intake. My FPR is mounted on the EBCS bracket and the fuel filter is mounted to the driver's side of the intake, but other than that, it's largely unseen.

The hose looped near the dipstick is a fuel line.

@yamahaSHO - is this still a series setup? Based on the FPR location, it seems like this setup doesn't follow your breakdown of a series fuel line layout which you mentioned preferring over a parallel setup:

RE: Fuel Line Diagram thread:

"1. From firewall
2. Driver rear injector
3. Driver front injector
4. Passenger rear injector
5. Passenger front injector
6. Fuel pressure regulator
7. Firewall"

I ask because I am looking to maintain a series system based off of the explanation provided by Dom (of the late Maxwell Power) while still upgrading the build with custom lines. The issue is: there are very few resources that supply recommendations for FPRs that are ideal for series systems and almost every manufacturer (IAG, Radium, Perrin...etc.) only produces kits for parallel setups due to the popularity of parallel installs.

My build will be a ~400HP (max, likely sub-400 HP) setup for a 2016 EJ257 with a COBB TD05H-20G Turbo, 1050cc injectors, AEM 340lph fuel pump and everything 6AN.

@yamahaSHO
Any recommendations on solid FPR/direct mount rails or any other parts you would suggest for a series setup? Radium Engineering does have a direct mount series kit but I don't know if it's the best. What brands are your go-to for building out series systems?

I can create a new thread if needed, this one is old.
 

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@yamahaSHO - is this still a series setup? Based on the FPR location, it seems like this setup doesn't follow your breakdown of a series fuel line layout which you mentioned preferring over a parallel setup:

RE: Fuel Line Diagram thread:

"1. From firewall
2. Driver rear injector
3. Driver front injector
4. Passenger rear injector
5. Passenger front injector
6. Fuel pressure regulator
7. Firewall"

I ask because I am looking to maintain a series system based off of the explanation provided by Dom (of the late Maxwell Power) while still upgrading the build with custom lines. The issue is: there are very few resources that supply recommendations for FPRs that are ideal for series systems and almost every manufacturer (IAG, Radium, Perrin...etc.) only produces kits for parallel setups due to the popularity of parallel installs.

My build will be a ~400HP (max, likely sub-400 HP) setup for a 2016 EJ257 with a COBB TD05H-20G Turbo, 1050cc injectors, AEM 340lph fuel pump and everything 6AN.

@yamahaSHO
Any recommendations on solid FPR/direct mount rails or any other parts you would suggest for a series setup? Radium Engineering does have a direct mount series kit but I don't know if it's the best. What brands are your go-to for building out series systems?

I can create a new thread if needed, this one is old.
Yes, my car was still series, following the exact same path as OEM.

I used Aeromtive on my car, which has the ability to do parallel, but if you only use one inlet and plug the other, you can use it in series. This will be fairly common on many FPR's. I did my initial setup before knowing I could just swap OEM top feed parts over and run top feed injectors, so I had the ID top feed kit. I did not add any dampers as my car already had some from the factory. I made all the lines myself, and I believe I used Russell hose and fittings (I did all this almost a decade ago).


For your build, I'd keep the stock rails and lines. If you need an FPR, you can adapt one like mine as we've done it on many cars before. If you want to add dampers, look at how the earlier STi's did them.
 

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Yes, my car was still series, following the exact same path as OEM.

I used Aeromtive on my car, which has the ability to do parallel, but if you only use one inlet and plug the other, you can use it in series. This will be fairly common on many FPR's. I did my initial setup before knowing I could just swap OEM top feed parts over and run top feed injectors, so I had the ID top feed kit. I did not add any dampers as my car already had some from the factory. I made all the lines myself, and I believe I used Russell hose and fittings (I did all this almost a decade ago).


For your build, I'd keep the stock rails and lines. If you need an FPR, you can adapt one like mine as we've done it on many cars before. If you want to add dampers, look at how the earlier STi's did them.
Awesome, thanks so much for the insight! Will definitely be checking out everything you referenced here.

Cheers.
 

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Yes, my car was still series, following the exact same path as OEM.

I used Aeromtive on my car, which has the ability to do parallel, but if you only use one inlet and plug the other, you can use it in series. This will be fairly common on many FPR's. I did my initial setup before knowing I could just swap OEM top feed parts over and run top feed injectors, so I had the ID top feed kit. I did not add any dampers as my car already had some from the factory. I made all the lines myself, and I believe I used Russell hose and fittings (I did all this almost a decade ago).


For your build, I'd keep the stock rails and lines. If you need an FPR, you can adapt one like mine as we've done it on many cars before. If you want to add dampers, look at how the earlier STi's did them.
@yamahaSHO - final series question for you: Radium Engineering has their plumbing setup so that the turbo (passenger) side receives fuel first. I have seen people claim that this supposedly helps with fuel/rail temps as "cold" fuel is serving the hottest (from turbo heat) rail first. Is this the best route to go?

Automotive lighting Automotive exterior Auto part Fashion accessory Motor vehicle

Radium's website: "The system is designed to be run in series with the feed line from the firewall ran to the turbo side fuel rail port first, as shown."

OEM doesn't run it this way, and I certainly don't know better than the Subaru engineers, but is there ever a reason to run the lines to the turbo side first?

Thanks in advance.
 

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I don't know how much it helps having fuel hit that cylinder first... It's generally not the cylinder that goes first, so there's that. If those people aren't providing data, it's a theory... And it's direct correlation into safety is another data collection point that I imagine hasn't really been tested.

Without putting an EGT into every exhaust runner, you could swap some per-cylinder fueling comps around, but that's just a guess without proof.

Do I think it will hurt anything? Probably not. Will it make routing easier? Maybe in your case.
 

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I don't know how much it helps having fuel hit that cylinder first... It's generally not the cylinder that goes first, so there's that. If those people aren't providing data, it's a theory... And it's direct correlation into safety is another data collection point that I imagine hasn't really been tested.

Without putting an EGT into every exhaust runner, you could swap some per-cylinder fueling comps around, but that's just a guess without proof.

Do I think it will hurt anything? Probably not. Will it make routing easier? Maybe in your case.
Thanks again for lending your knowledge!

Cheers.
 
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