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After years of being asked to develop a Killer B Motorsport Air/Oil Separator, we are nearing our release for the FA20 WRX Air/Oil Separator. This is a product we’ve been asked to develop for many years, and in that time there has been a lot of research, engineering, simulations, development, testing (and repeat), with several Subaru engines and build types. This has been going on over many seasons exposing to environmental extremes, and driving conditions (daily driving, auto-X, drag racing, dyno testing, etc.), as well as on stock engines and exceeding 700whp.

The goal of this product is simple. To function as its Air/Oil Separator description implies: the removal of oil, in liquid or vapor form, from the vented crankcase gasses.

Simple in premise, but function wise there’s a bit more to it. Varying oil droplet sizes, with differing pressure and velocity conditions. Different engines with varying venting characteristics or a street car vs a track or performance elevated engine. The variable list goes on, making acceptable function and performance a difficult challenge.

Performance must be spot on, but the effects on the engine’s operation must be unchanged at the least, or improved ad best. We prefer the later. This is accomplished by using a design that has no restrictions; media or baffles, to reduce the flow potential of the crankcase and head vents. Under positive boost conditions it will produce vacuum in the crankcase. The benefit of this is improved evacuation of crankcase gasses and the many other benefits that can be had with crankcase vacuum; improved ring seal, reduced oil consumption and improved power potential.

The Killer B Motorsport Air/Oil Separator functions with a vacuum source only, the turbo inlet. This provides the vacuum source for the crankcase. It is in no way effected by the turbo size, in fact a larger turbo that draws more air will improved separator function, compensating for increased venting requirements seen at improved performance levels. While small OEM turbochargers produce crankcase vacuum under boost, larger turbochargers produce more.

Drain back design assures any oil that accumulates, ends up where it needs to be, in the oil pan assuring consistent supply to the engine. Six stainless steel bolts on the top, make it quick and easy for inspection and cleaning. It is not heated and we see no reason to add unnecessary cooling/heating (weight, complexity, increased install time, and increase probability of something leaking) and this simple engineered form functions just fine without it.

The Killer B Motorsport Air/Oil Separator should meet and exceeds your expectations of how an Air/Oil Separator should work and function on a Subaru engine. Not only that, it will display some of the best eye candy fabrication available.

As we finalize production details we will begin to take orders, soon. They will be processed on a first pay first ship basis and we expect significant demand for this product that you the enthusiasts, have been waiting years for. If you’d like further details on pricing, options, and availability, please feel free to contact us at [email protected]



 

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Discussion Starter #2
I know it's the FA version, but a sneak peek into what the production units look like. GR version is right around the corner...





 

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Oooh perfect timing.

Couple of questions...

There seems to be a lot of buzz about the IAG AOS recently, with the fact that it is heated being discussed as a big advantage. What's your take on that? Or more accurately, why did you choose to not go that route with yours?

Secondly, will this fit with a strut tower brace on a GD? Just added a brace to my 05 and really felt a difference. I'd rather be able to keep it.

EDIT: Just read a bit more closely and see you addressed the heating bit briefly in the info about it. All that being said... could you elaborate a bit more on why you aren't concerned with condensation forming and mixing into the oil?
 

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There seems to be a lot of buzz about the IAG AOS recently, with the fact that it is heated being discussed as a big advantage. What's your take on that? Or more accurately, why did you choose to not go that route with yours?
I've been seeing this come up a LOT since we released our unit, from users and manufacturers. There are some things to keep in mind when considering a heated unit that some manufacturers won't tell you. One is that the lines are not heated. Search and you'll find even OEM lines on OEM setups can clog with 'goo' if left uninspected in conditions that cause a lot of build-up (something that is different for every driver, environmental conditions, engine, etc.). This holds true for any aftermarket unit as well, since the lines are not heated themselves. It does prevent accumulation in the unit itself.

Another aspect of our unit is simplicity; it comes apart easy, it cleans easy, it doesn't have media like the Moroso unit that eventually looses effectiveness (even when cleaned), and there are no additional cooling lines, clamps, or seals that can eventually fail (search this and you'll find heated AOS units that leak). I'm a big proponent of the Keep It Simple mantra. While we do recommend at least inspection, and possibly clearing (if it needs it), at oil changes, we've made it so it's less than a 5-minute job.

We went the direction on heating because track guys prioritize finishing races, because of this they have a priority on simple systems that have less opportunities for failure, lower weight, and of course... it must perform well under racing conditions.

Secondly, will this fit with a strut tower brace on a GD? Just added a brace to my 05 and really felt a difference. I'd rather be able to keep it.
Placebo? I've used a few different versions on our 05 STi and notice zero change in performance. I eventually removed it, as it was just excess weight to drag around the track. This is fairly well documented by others as well; the GD chassis in that area has very little flex. Maybe more conclusive data is out there, I'm going off info that is years old.

EDIT: Just read a bit more closely and see you addressed the heating bit briefly in the info about it. All that being said... could you elaborate a bit more on why you aren't concerned with condensation forming and mixing into the oil?
The condensation has been in internal combustion engines for over 100 years. There is zero technical papers or evidence that it does ANYTHING. Think of it as a 'normal' part of the combustion process. It's on EVERY internal engine component (the yellow goo). some areas accumulate more than others, but it is EVERYWHERE. I've seen AOS units marketed as 'removing harmful goo' from your engine's oil, but this is complete BS and preying on customers lack of knowledge on that disgusting looking stuff is. If it was harmful, someone over the last 100 years would have found a way to remove it.
 

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I've been seeing this come up a LOT since we released our unit, from users and manufacturers. There are some things to keep in mind when considering a heated unit that some manufacturers won't tell you. One is that the lines are not heated. Search and you'll find even OEM lines on OEM setups can clog with 'goo' if left uninspected in conditions that cause a lot of build-up (something that is different for every driver, environmental conditions, engine, etc.). This holds true for any aftermarket unit as well, since the lines are not heated themselves. It does prevent accumulation in the unit itself.

Another aspect of our unit is simplicity; it comes apart easy, it cleans easy, it doesn't have media like the Moroso unit that eventually looses effectiveness (even when cleaned), and there are no additional cooling lines, clamps, or seals that can eventually fail (search this and you'll find heated AOS units that leak). I'm a big proponent of the Keep It Simple mantra. While we do recommend at least inspection, and possibly clearing (if it needs it), at oil changes, we've made it so it's less than a 5-minute job.

We went the direction on heating because track guys prioritize finishing races, because of this they have a priority on simple systems that have less opportunities for failure, lower weight, and of course... it must perform well under racing conditions.

The condensation has been in internal combustion engines for over 100 years. There is zero technical papers or evidence that it does ANYTHING. Think of it as a 'normal' part of the combustion process. It's on EVERY internal engine component (the yellow goo). some areas accumulate more than others, but it is EVERYWHERE. I've seen AOS units marketed as 'removing harmful goo' from your engine's oil, but this is complete BS and preying on customers lack of knowledge on that disgusting looking stuff is. If it was harmful, someone over the last 100 years would have found a way to remove it.
Gotcha. All makes sense. Appreciate the detailed info! I've been thinking of an AOS recently as, while the car consumes zero oil on a normal basis, it's starting to see a lot more track time and I usually notice a good bit of consumption that I think is caused by blowby. I'd been holding off on the IAG one precisely because it just seems like such a complicated system, both to install and in terms of how many things there are that could fail.

killerbmotorsport said:
Placebo? I've used a few different versions on our 05 STi and notice zero change in performance. I eventually removed it, as it was just excess weight to drag around the track. This is fairly well documented by others as well; the GD chassis in that area has very little flex. Maybe more conclusive data is out there, I'm going off info that is years old.
I always thought they did nothing as well. Got one basically for the cost of a 6 pack so decided to bolt it on. Went out on my favorite curvy little test road expecting to feel nothing at all. To my surprise I immediately noticed how much sharper the turn in feel felt. Could be placebo I suppose, but I was definitely not expecting to notice anything.

In either case... I'm assuming that means that the AOS wouldn't clear a bar?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
it just seems like such a complicated system, both to install and in terms of how many things there are that could fail.
Many of our products are used by hard core track guys, and this is exactly the reason why we went the easy to inspect/maintain vs adding things that may prolong maintenance but increase the probability of an unfortunate experience. If track guys DNF, they can't win, accrue points, impress sponsors, get all the babes, and so on. So we went the direction we did knowing it needs to be easy to work on for the street guys, and 'failure is not an option' reliable for the track guys.

I always thought they did nothing as well. Got one basically for the cost of a 6 pack so decided to bolt it on. Went out on my favorite curvy little test road expecting to feel nothing at all. To my surprise I immediately noticed how much sharper the turn in feel felt. Could be placebo I suppose, but I was definitely not expecting to notice anything.

In either case... I'm assuming that means that the AOS wouldn't clear a bar?
I has a similar but opposite experience. Came across a SUPER rare Fuji carbon fiber and titanium support bar. It looked awesome and was extremely stiff. I kept it on the car for a few weeks and then sold it. I experienced zero change or improvement. I replaced it with a bunch of Whiteline bushing, that for half the cost made a marked improvement in response and feedback. There is a definite split in the community as the the effectiveness of these bars, as our experiences mirror here.

In short, I highly doubt it would work with that bar :(
 

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Discussion Starter #12
And yes these units come with the worlds most expensive fitting on top. Made from Billet 6061-T6 and turned on a 5th Axis Lathe with a Milling Head. Then MIL-spec Hard Anodize, this is not just the more common commercial anodizing that nearly all aftermarket products use. Finally a proprietary Furnace Baked Thread Lubricant/Sealant is added to the threads so they will never gall, seize, or leak. This is all our own custom design that has a horn shaped inlet to maximize flow potential and requires no hose clamps when using our motorsports grade hoses.

 

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Do you have any pics of your AOS installed on a 2015+ STI? I just got my car back from the dealership after having the short block replaced under warranty for rod knock. Now I'm shopping for an AOS and looking to pickup your Oil pickup, baffle and pan. I'd love to see how your AOS looks in the 2015 engine bay.
 

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liking!

i'm glad you guys made one. the industry started with the crawford unit and progressively, more companies wanted to make one. I have installed a few IAG units and while it's a nice piece, the amount of lines is overwhelming. I struggled where to tuck certain ones and make the overall appearance nice in an engine bay.

With yours, you recommend it on a highly built STI as well as a daily driven? I will most likely be digging into this once I go stage 2 all at once.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
NEW DEVELOPMENT

AOS Catch Can Add-On now available...

The Killer B Motorsport Performance AOS Catch Can Add-On is a component that can be added to the Killer B Motorsport AOS for those that do not want to drain collected liquids back into the crankcase.

• High Performance Function of our AOS maintained without the need to drain collected liquid back into the crankcase.
• Made from billet aluminum
• TIG welded
• Stainless mount Fitting and Brass Drain Valve
• Made in the USA





 

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Bump this to the top.

We now have everything, including the catch can add-on, in stock and ready to go. We ramped up production in preparation for race season :)
 

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My Subie shop said this was a major PITA to install as there are no instructions and just a poorly edited video. Evidently there were four plugs required to complete the install and the kit only came with two.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
My Subie shop said this was a major PITA to install as there are no instructions and just a poorly edited video. Evidently there were four plugs required to complete the install and the kit only came with two.
To any shop familiar with Subarus this shouldn't be difficult. I can see how it could be for someone not familiar with the boxer engine PCV system. It's far less time consuming than an AOS with coolant lines. We do have a diagram on our website for reference.

Where did they use two additional plugs? There should only be two. One on the intake and another on the throttle body.
 
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