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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Background: So, after spending a month in Brazil and letting my 2008 STi (6yrs, 60k miles) sit outside at a family member’s house after Christmas, I came back to a car with a dead battery and a hood latch that wouldn’t close (some spray lubricant on the right side catch mechanism fixed that). After jump-starting the car, I had the check engine light and flashing Cruise and S indicators. I checked the AP, code P1410 (Secondary Air Injection System Valve Stuck Open), and hoped it was only a fluke, so I cleared it out and drove 2 hours back to Mississippi. Two days later, I drove 11 hours back to Virginia and didn’t have any problems. After letting the car rest in the garage and doing some maintenance work, the next start got the check engine light again, P2440 (Secondary Air Injection System Valve Stuck Open – Bank 1). After doing some research (links below), I thought of a few options:

1. Go to the Subaru dealer, hoping for a warranty fix, or spend some unknown amount of money ($800-1800) for a replacement secondary air valve, or two; and wait for it to happen again in a few years.

2. Buy some Subaru secondary air valves (~$300 each?) and replace them myself; and wait for it to happen again.

3. Buy some aftermarket secondary air valves (Spectra Premium EMV1000, EMV1001) for $280 and replace them myself; and wait for it to happen again.

4. Buy some block off plates and install them, pull the fuses, and disable the CEL codes in AccessTuner Race for my AP map and not have to worry about it again. The option then becomes which plates and where to block off:

a. Buy some 3rd party block off plates ($30-60) that are custom made for the heads and easily install the left one and then remove the turbo heat shield, downpipe, uppipe, and other junk just to install the right side plate, possibly able to reconnect the existing parts; or leaving parts dangling around or disconnected; or remove the intake manifold to remove all of the parts properly.

b. Buy some Subaru EGR block off plates (14754AA050 $4/ea #14754AA050: PLATE-E.G.R. ) and install at the heads, requiring all of the above, plus possible re-drilling of the left side plate holes; (11084AA020 can even be seen on the RH side, but it costs $9 INTAKE MANIFOLD. SECONDARY AIR SYSTEM '06MY-.. Fits: Subaru | Subaru Parts Online )

c. Buy some Subaru EGR block off plates and install at the secondary air valves, possibly able to reconnect the existing parts, and hopefully not having to remove the intake manifold, downpipe or uppipe

5. Disable the CEL codes and wait for the exhaust gases to backtrack up to the air pump and melt the air pump, catch on fire, and have flames shooting out of the hood scoop.

After considering the options, I thought about going to the dealer and hoping for a warranty fix since it seems to be a common problem; but I know that would again delay the inevitable. So, I would rather fix it for good. That meant going the block off plate route. I really didn’t want to spend the crazy amount of money for some pieces of metal for aftermarket plates, so I bought two of the Subaru block off plates (14754AA050) and planned to install them at the air valves, hopefully keeping the LH air valve since it has the barometric sensor. Since SammyG was able to do this and had a picture as proof, I figured this would be the route I attempt (http://www.iwsti.com/forums/4040892-post58.html) and hoped I wouldn’t have to remove the intake manifold. And, living in Virginia, I wanted to keep everything looking stock for visual inspection in case that mattered.

Parts needed:

2x 14754AA050 Plate-EGR

If you plan to remove both air valves, I would also suggest getting some 10mm nuts for the bolts to fasten to:

4x 023806006 Flange Nut (10mm size) BATTERY EQUIPMENT.. Fits: 2008 Subaru STI WAGON | Subaru Parts Online

If you plan to leave the LH valve in, you'll just need 2 of the 10mm nuts.

If you don’t like reusing gaskets:

2x Gaskets (not sure what part number, as I reused the existing ones)

Tools needed:

- 3/8”
o Ratchet
o Torque wrench
o 10mm socket (I have shallow 12pt and deep 6pt)
o 12mm socket
o 4” wobble extension
o 12” wobble extension (the wobble wasn’t as important here)
o Universal joint
o ¼” socket adapter

- 1/4”
o Ratchet
o Torque wrench (mine is 20-200 in-lb)
o 10mm shallow socket (I used 6pt)
o 12mm shallow socket (I used 6pt)
o 4” wobble extension
o 12” wobble extension (having the wobble helps here)
o Short universal joint*** (beware: impact u-joints are taller)

- 10mm thin ratcheting combination wrench
- 12mm thin ratcheting combination wrench (the thinner the better for this one)
- Medium sized channel locks and pliers and pry bars for manipulating
- Jack and jackstands, shop light, gloves, etc

Torque specs:
- 10mm air valve to air tube bolts: 6.6 ft-lbs (79.2 in-lbs)
- 12mm air valve mount bracket bolts: 14.0 ft-lbs
- 10mm PCV tube to intercooler bolts: 4.1 ft-lbs (49.2 in-lbs)
- 12mm BPV and IC mount bolts: 11.8 ft-lbs (141.6 in-lbs)
- 8mm? turbo inlet hose clamp and TB hose clamps: 2.2 ft-lbs (26.4 in-lbs)

Procedure:

1. Jack up the front end of the car, support with jackstands

2. Remove the intercooler: http://www.iwsti.com/forums/diy-mods-and-installations/131480-remove-intercooler-2008-sti.html

3. To make space for what I was doing, I had to also remove the intercooler to throttle body tube and remove the air bypass valve from the air bypass valve hose so I could pull the BPV hose from under the TB coolant hose.(see the green arrows in airvalvesconnectors.jpg) http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/m501/bikepoet/STi Secondary Air Valve Block Plate Install/airvalvesconnectors.jpg

4. Disconnect the electrical connections (one on each air valve, one on the throttle, and one under the TB)

5. Remove the Air Duct A that connects to the air valves from the Air Duct B off the air pump http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/m501/bikepoet/STi Secondary Air Valve Block Plate Install/airvalves1.jpg

6. Remove the 12mm bolt that holds the top of the LH air valve bracket (gives extra space)

7. For the RH air valve, to get to the 10mm invisible bolt, I figured I should just remove the RH air valve altogether. To do this without removing the intake manifold, the 12mm bolt of fury under the intake manifold has to be removed. To get to this, I used a variety of wrenches and extensions, but the 12mm ¼” socket with ¼” universal joint with extension did the most work. Then a 12mm ratcheting combination wrench helped out when the bolt was up too far that the u-joint didn’t work. This is where having the most compact u-joint is an advantage. http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/m501/bikepoet/STi Secondary Air Valve Block Plate Install/rhairvalvetools.jpg

8. Once the RH air valve bracket bolt of fury was out, I could wiggle the RH air valve up enough to get to the 10mm invisible bolt using ¼” socket, a short wobble extension, ¼” universal joint, and a longer ¼” wobble extension. Then the 10mm visible bolt holding the RH air tube to the air valve was easily removed and the RH air valve could be removed.

9. Since I didn’t plan to re-install the RH air valve, I would need some nuts to go on the bolts coming out of the air valve. I didn’t have anything laying around, so I decided to borrow some from the battery tie downs and replace those later. If you plan to remove both air valves, you’ll need appropriate nuts to reuse with the bolts, such as the same size as the battery tie down nuts. Getting the bolts in and then getting the gasket to stay on and putting the blocking plate on did require some finesse in the fingers. Bolt torque is 79.2 in-lb.

10. For the LH air valve, I thought it would be easiest to leave the air valve and barometric sensor intact and keep the valve attached to the tube, only implanting the block plate between the valve and the gasket. Unfortunately, because of the stiffness of the PITA LH air tube and the PITA LH air valve bracket, it’s a little difficult getting the block plate in and then getting all of the bolts and holes to line up. This is where using some channel locks and pry bars to bend and wiggle stuff will help. I had to remove the 12mm lower LH air bracket bolts to help with this, too. Once I got everything lined up and bolts and nuts on, I torqued everything appropriately using the variety of tools listed above.

11. Once the block plates are installed, it should look something like this: http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/m501/bikepoet/STi Secondary Air Valve Block Plate Install/blockplatesinstalled.jpg

12. Get the BPV hose back in place and reconnected to the BPV (the metal clips have some fancy hooks to keep the ring open while installing), reconnect the connector under the TB and reconnect the LH air valve with the barometric sensor.

13. Put the Air Duct A back on the LH air valve and connect with Air Duct B http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/m501/bikepoet/STi Secondary Air Valve Block Plate Install/readytoreinstallintercooler.jpg

14. Reinstall the intercooler: http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/m501/bikepoet/STi Secondary Air Valve Block Plate Install/intercooler.jpg

15. For the fuses, remove the 60A large fuse (Air Pump) and the 10A small fuse (Air Cut) from under the hood.

16. For disabling the check engine light codes, your AccessPort map can’t be locked. Open AccessTuner Race and load your map. On the menu, click Edit, Advanced Parameters. Uncheck the codes:
P0410, P0411, P0413, P0414, P0416, P0417, P0418, P1410, P1418, P2431, P2432, P2433, P2440, P2441, P2442, P2443, P2444 Save the map and reflash your car.
(If you are pro-tuned with a locked map, contact your tuner. They should be able to do the changes really quickly and easily.)

17. Lower the car, etc.

18. Start up the car and check for leaks, etc. I noticed my AFR’s at startup seemed a little richer for the first minute or so, but I really don’t have good data previously to know what they were.

All images: http://s1129.photobucket.com/user/bikepoet/library/STi Secondary Air Valve Block Plate Install

Other supporting threads:
http://www.iwsti.com/forums/diy-mods-and-installations/276425-how-gr-air-pump-delete-photos.html
http://www.iwsti.com/forums/diy-mods-and-installations/177486-08-air-pump-removal.html
http://www.iwsti.com/forums/gr-general/185370-p2440-p1410-codes-5.html
http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2182443



The good thing about this fix is that the air pump and LH valve stay on the engine and won’t draw any unnecessary attention from anyone inspecting any emissions components. Also, if someone did want to actually replace the air valves with new ones, I suppose it could be done without taking the intake manifold off.

Let me know if I missed something or if you have any suggestions.
 

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Good write up. I wasn't patient enough to try it and paid a local shop $300+ parts for the honor. They left everything in there except for one of the hard pipes. Next time I do spark plugs some of it will not be going back.

An interesting problem I had was that when they put everything back together I was over boosting with the Cobb Stage 1+SF NWG. I had to flash the LWG map to hit the boost targets. I have been running for close to a year with no issues at all.

Recently I sold my SF intake and went to the stock intake. Interestingly I had to use the NWG map to get the right boost targets.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Good write up. I wasn't patient enough to try it and paid a local shop $300+ parts for the honor. They left everything in there except for one of the hard pipes. Next time I do spark plugs some of it will not be going back.

An interesting problem I had was that when they put everything back together I was over boosting with the Cobb Stage 1+SF NWG. I had to flash the LWG map to hit the boost targets. I have been running for close to a year with no issues at all.

Recently I sold my SF intake and went to the stock intake. Interestingly I had to use the NWG map to get the right boost targets.
That is quite an interesting situation. From all I've read, I thought the secondary air pump, ducts, valves, and pipes weren't functional after the first minute from startup; so I do wonder how the blocking plates change exhaust pressures and flows through the system. I know most of the other writeups have the blocking plates installed at the heads; this one is different as they're installed at the end of the hard air pipes.

For the record, my car has the stock intake.
 

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This is also a good option for those in California who are faced with a strict visual inspection during emissions testing. I doubt an inspector would notice the thin plates sandwiched in there.

Here are a couple pics of KSTech injection valve block-off plates installed:



 

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This is great, thanks for the write up. Everyone else had been installing the block off plates at the head, but I really wanted to do it at the valves.

In case anyone is also considering the options you posted, I replaced both valves with the Spectra Premium ones and the RHS one failed after about 4 months. Wish I had of stumbled upon this write-up a few months ago! I'm gonna go the block off route now.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Any issues with this so far?
Im thinking the same thing needs to happen on my rig.
No issues for me.

I'll be upgrading to Stage 2, so I'll have to edit the OTS map to remove the codes as expected.

I wonder if this design was updated in the 2015 WRX F-series engine or the 2015 Legacy.

Looking back, I'm really glad I had those wobble extensions and universal joints. If you have a buddy that has a different selection of extensions and u-joints, go ahead and borrow them just in case. I had to get really creative with the extensions and joints and wrenches.
 

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So if you do Step 4 or the below Will you be able to pass emissions?

"Buy some block off plates and install them, pull the fuses, and disable the CEL codes in AccessTuner Race for my AP map and not have to worry about it again. The option then becomes which plates and where to block off".
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So if you do Step 4 or the below Will you be able to pass emissions?

"Buy some block off plates and install them, pull the fuses, and disable the CEL codes in AccessTuner Race for my AP map and not have to worry about it again. The option then becomes which plates and where to block off".
There are some tips in this thread that might help. I don't know anything about emissions since we don't have emissions testing in central VA.

2006 WRX: P2444 Secondary Air Pump Stuck On - NASIOC

I am getting the fault codes p2444 and p0410
Check the link above too for some info on those codes. Best thing to do is figure out what exactly is the problem based on the codes. Depending on what year and where you are, you may get some goodwill warranty or California emissions warranty.
 

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Thanks for the Awesome write up!

I have a 2011 STI and the P2443 Secondary Air Valve Closed (Bank 2) <- which appears to be the RH valve came up recently. I got the 2 replacement valves for $507 but tried working on it yesterday and can't seem to get the RH valve out at all. Apparently the older models have more clearance or I'm pretty much screwed with having to take the intake manifold off per the Service Manual.

I will order some wobble 1/4 extensions since the main screw holding it on was the invisible screw on the valve.

Anybody on here with a 2011 able to get the RH valve out without taking the intake manifold off?

Any tips would be appreciated. I'm just worried if I put the blocking plates on it would fail the NYS Emissions during inspection.

Thanks

Ellery
 

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10. For the LH air valve, I thought it would be easiest to leave the air valve and barometric sensor intact and keep the valve attached to the tube, only implanting the block plate between the valve and the gasket. Unfortunately, because of the stiffness of the PITA LH air tube and the PITA LH air valve bracket, it’s a little difficult getting the block plate in and then getting all of the bolts and holes to line up. This is where using some channel locks and pry bars to bend and wiggle stuff will help. I had to remove the 12mm lower LH air bracket bolts to help with this, too. Once I got everything lined up and bolts and nuts on, I torqued everything appropriately using the variety of tools listed above.

Can you block off ports at the heads and simply turn off all codes, pull fuses, and leave right hand valve in place because of the sensor but remove everything else?
 

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Can you block off ports at the heads, remove all components but leave right hand valve in because of sensor and disable codes pull/pull fuses?
 

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Yes thats what I did. Removed everything blocked the ports. Kept the barometric sensor connected and disabled the codes.
 

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I don't understand the point of deleting the sec air pump but not removing all the unnecessary hardware. You can turn off all the codes using AP Race. You'll pass emissions every time without a hitch. Also, for those of you that are cheap, the plates are largely a gimmick. You can avoid the them all together by:

1. Drill & Tap the air holes on the heads using an M10-1.25 tap
2. Vacuum out the tap shavings
3. Get two 25MM M10-1.25 fasteners and cover threads with ultra grey
4. Tighten both to 30 ft-lbs
5. Job done, 45 minutes tops.

Congratulations, you just saved your self a couple hundred bucks and this method will never leak. The plates and the flimsy steel gasket will eventually leak, especially the one by the turbo.
 

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I don't understand the point of deleting the sec air pump but not removing all the unnecessary hardware. You can turn off all the codes using AP Race. You'll pass emissions every time without a hitch. Also, for those of you that are cheap, the plates are largely a gimmick. You can avoid the them all together by:

1. Drill & Tap the air holes on the heads using an M10-1.25 tap
2. Vacuum out the tap shavings
3. Get two 25MM M10-1.25 fasteners and cover threads with ultra grey
4. Tighten both to 30 ft-lbs
5. Job done, 45 minutes tops.

Congratulations, you just saved your self a couple hundred bucks and this method will never leak. The plates and the flimsy steel gasket will eventually leak, especially the one by the turbo.
Well the barometric sensor is required. Anything else can be removed.
 

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Well the barometric sensor is required. Anything else can be removed.
Not trying to be argumentative but the sensor is not needed. Once your MAP is adjusted to accommodate the absence of the pump and its related hardware the sensor does nothing. I've done this mod on four STI's, one of them mine. 60k miles later not a single problem. The other three each have put on over 20k miles after the mod and not a single problem. All vehicles were 08+ STI's.
 

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Not trying to be argumentative but the sensor is not needed. Once your MAP is adjusted to accommodate the absence of the pump and its related hardware the sensor does nothing. I've done this mod on four STI's, one of them mine. 60k miles later not a single problem. The other three each have put on over 20k miles after the mod and not a single problem. All vehicles were 08+ STI's.
Well, I have seen alot of cars without the sensor and they run very well. But I guess they will face an issue when they drive up a mountain, the atmospheric pressure table will not be effective.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I don't understand the point of deleting the sec air pump but not removing all the unnecessary hardware. You can turn off all the codes using AP Race. You'll pass emissions every time without a hitch. Also, for those of you that are cheap, the plates are largely a gimmick. You can avoid the them all together by:

1. Drill & Tap the air holes on the heads using an M10-1.25 tap
2. Vacuum out the tap shavings
3. Get two 25MM M10-1.25 fasteners and cover threads with ultra grey
4. Tighten both to 30 ft-lbs
5. Job done, 45 minutes tops.

Congratulations, you just saved your self a couple hundred bucks and this method will never leak. The plates and the flimsy steel gasket will eventually leak, especially the one by the turbo.
I thought my technique would be the cheapest of the cheap, because I'm pretty cheap. When you say the plates are a gimmick, do you mean the expensive ones that cost $30+? My Subaru OEM block off plates cost $4 each and I had to buy two small metric bolts since I actually did remove the RH valve but needed something to hold the plate to the cross tube. I think my total parts outlay was around $10. Now, I did have all of the sockets and wobble extensions, but I didn't have to buy a tap and die set. For the shadetree mechanic like me, I feel more comfortable not drilling into my head. And really, I suck at vacuuming. Ask my wife. I would probably leave a bunch of aluminum shavings inside my engine. My technique seemed to be the easiest (for me), lowest risk, and cheapest, of all of the methods I have seen. Since the M10-1.25 tap only takes you 45 minutes, that is likely easier for many people, but if your state does visual emissions testing, you might fail if you remove all of the hardware. The in-line block off plates are discreet.
 

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Hi all,
I guess thread is kind of old but i still see STIs with this problem. I have one =).

Anyhow in 2020, theres a new solution for this problem which is worth a read, it doesn't *require block plates per se, and it doesn't need any ecu tunes. Google for Planet Vulcan Labs X-Form
I've had my x form unit for 1/2 year now and it works perfectly.
 
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