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Discussion Starter #1
Hey All,

I finally pinched enough pennies to buy a new short block. RalliSpec street spec pro value with cosworth pistons and 14mm studs...not quite "the works" but definitely an upgrade from OEM. Anyway, the rallispec guy told me that because I have rod knock and metal in my oilpan, I need to clean everything to make sure there is no metal left.

What is a good method to clean internals, and do I clean *everything*, the oil touches? Do I clean the turbo as well?
 

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Clean or replace. Most shops replace. Some things, notably AVCS gears aren't worth cleaning and they are not cheap. Oil cooler, and turbo too. Many here believe that not getting this right one way or another has led to many a failed rebuild.

Do you feel lucky applies here!
 

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Thanks mheyman. What method do I use to clean the parts? Do I use...brake cleaner? Mineral oil? I'm happy to put the time and elbow grease in, I just don't know how to do the actual cleaning :)
 

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I would think a parts clean air pressure and luck Except for the cam gears. They can be dissembled.

Again many shops try to eliminate the luck necessary by replacing . . . because you cant inspect inside parts like the oil cooler.
 

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Thanks mheyman. What method do I use to clean the parts? Do I use...brake cleaner? Mineral oil? I'm happy to put the time and elbow grease in, I just don't know how to do the actual cleaning :)
I've read a lot about being thorough with cleaning, but I'm not sure how to do these things particularly. Also, if reusing heads with a new block, you'll need to have a machine shop resurface the mating surface of the heads.

Here's a writeup from another forum member on AVCS cam gear cleaning:
AVCS Gear Cleaning Guide! (Read this if you spun a bearing!)
 

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If you still have the banjo filter that leads to the turbo, then you should be okay, in regards to the turbo itself. The oil cooler has tiny vanes and passages and it's technically impossible to clean the cooler effectively, so 99% of people just replace it.



The AVCS gears on the other hand can be cleaned but it can also be a tedious process so make sure you're comfortable doing it yourself. If you're not, then Outfront Motorsports does the cleaning professionally, just give them a call to find out how much it will be.



Lastly, you can use parts/brake cleaner to clean most metal parts but keep in mind that stuff is potent and can dry out rubber very quickly so be careful cleaning rubber hoses or parts that have rubber in it.
 

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What about other parts like AVCS solenoids ? Are these pretty straight forward to clean ?

Yup. Pop them out, spray it good with some cleaner and dry with compressed air. Don't let the cleaner dry out normally because I believe there are plastic components inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Also, if reusing heads with a new block, you'll need to have a machine shop resurface the mating surface of the heads.
I'm curious about this - why is resurfacing necessary?

Also, I got the intake manifold off yesterday (along with the turbo, up-pipe*, starter, secondary air pump and various brackets and shields), and the gasket surfaces have remnants of the gaskets on them. How robust are these surfaces, how hard can I scrub to clean?

*Stock up-pipe has the shell surrounding the ceramic heat shield (or whatever is inside) completely detached from the welds. Is this usable, or do I need a replacement?
 

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If you still have the banjo filter that leads to the turbo,
Why would I not have the banjo filter, just if I'd done work and removed it previously?

Turbo exhaust side has a crack in the iron housing...but that seems to be somewhat "normal" from what I'm reading online?

Also thanks for your responses, and the writeup on the AVCS gear cleaning will come in really handy once I get to that point. I like being hands on and learning it as I go, so while I'm not totally comfortable with this whole process, it's fun and I'm learning a lot from it. More posts to come with questions and updates, I'm sure. Thanks again.
 

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I'm curious about this - why is resurfacing necessary?

Also, I got the intake manifold off yesterday (along with the turbo, up-pipe*, starter, secondary air pump and various brackets and shields), and the gasket surfaces have remnants of the gaskets on them. How robust are these surfaces, how hard can I scrub to clean?

*Stock up-pipe has the shell surrounding the ceramic heat shield (or whatever is inside) completely detached from the welds. Is this usable, or do I need a replacement?

Resurfacing ensures the most flat surface possible on the deck on the head, and you want flatness to ensure a perfect head gasket seal. The machinist you use should take off the most minimal amount of material possible to start, then work down by thousandth's of an inch.
 

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Why would I not have the banjo filter, just if I'd done work and removed it previously?

Turbo exhaust side has a crack in the iron housing...but that seems to be somewhat "normal" from what I'm reading online?\

Yes, its common for techs to remove all banjo filters as this is an official SOA service recommendation. If you had your car worked on where any oil related parts were messed with, it's possible the banjo filter were removed.



Yes, wastegate cracks are common for VF turbos. If it's tiny then it's not a problem, but big cracks can turn into an issue.
 
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