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Drive True
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I've always used Arco gas on my Civic, but since I've heard lots of people say that Arco gas is cheaper quality (one of my coworkers even went into detail about how they handle their gas) that I've only used Arco once in my WRX. I almost always use Chevron with Techron Supreme (although once I was running on fumes so I went with Shell)

Anyway, any comments on gas brands? Is Arco gas really that bad? Or is their Supreme gas pretty good?

What about race gas, and is it worth it if you're gonna be racing on the track?
 

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I really don't know much about gas brands. I know there are differences, but I am not really sure if each brand keeps its reliability. What I mean is I have had "bad gas" :lol: from a few companies that normally do just fine. I think its never constant.

As far as race gas. I think it really depends on what kind of boost you are running. I know SCC did a test with the new 350Z and they said it actually ran 5 hp more on the dyno with higher octane gas. Cars these days are really smart to re-configure your a/f map. I would imagine the Sti would be very similar in that it has anti-knock and detonation measures like lowering the timing based on the octane it is receiving, temp, etc.

Basically, to answer your second question..it depends on the car..IMO.
 

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There is some confusion about "brands" of gas being different. In reality, all gas is the same. The way it works is this: All the oil companies use the same pipelines to transport fuel across the country. They put in 50,000 gallons on the west coast and take out 50,000 gallons on the east coast, for example. However, this trip takes about 13 days and most companies don't want to wait that long. What actually happens is that company X will put 50,000 gallons in and then immediately take out 50,000 gallons on the other end. This may or may not be company X's gas, but it doesn't really matter. Fuel standards are such that all gas has to meet the same guidelines. The only difference occurs at the depos where the gas is put in trucks for final delivery. There, individual companies add their own "additives" before they reach the station. However, these additives are more or less the same so it doesn't matter much there either. You are more likely to run into problems with gas due to it being mishandled or transported. However, I have found more often than not I run into problems with the name brand stations (Mobil, Shell, etc.) than I do with my local convenience store station that is $0.15 cheaper a gallon.

Hope this makes sense.

J.B.
WRXtra.com
 

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What I have heard is that if you buy regular gas, it is the same no matter where you get it from because they all get their gas from the same local place. It's when you get into the midgrade and premiums that they add their own different additives. I only use Mobil, Amaco, or Shell. I never got bad gas before, that I was aware of anyway. There was a local news channel here in Chicago that did an undercover test of most of the local mom and pop gas stations. They found that most of them had the same regular gas in all 3 pumps... regular, midgrade, and premium. It might cost a few cents more going with a name brand but at least you know what you are getting, especially if you are buying premium. Now for a beater that I am just putting regular in, I go for the cheapest price. My STi will only get name brand fuels.
 

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DCCD?

jbhebert Has it right. My dad is one of the head Engineers and Diamond Shamrock and he said all gas is the same. It is only at the plants that they add there "Additives."

And as far as good or bad gas goes you will have to take a closer look at the gas station you go too. I used to work at one and when we would get a heavy rain(about 4-5 inches) i would go out to check the tank levels that night and around the rim of the connector pipe would be filled with water. So that means it either stop right before spilling in or it just spilled in. Then you have to wonder how much and that water is not the only thing that could get in.

Note: Do not stop at a gas station that is near a creek or river.
 

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I would like to add upon SnowmanFX comment about what else could get into the underground tanks. From my personal experience, do not stop at a gas station that has the tanker truck filling the tanks. I had to replace a fuel pump (integrated filter) in my pickup because the tanker kicked up all the sentiment on the bottom of the tank and I pumped it into my truck :cry: I do not know if it was just one visit that did all the damage or the fact I used the same gas station many times before starting my morning commute. The time I stopped to get gas in the morning was right around the same time the tanker finished and left. Maybe its worth asking your local favorite gas station what time the tanker comes so you can avoid what happened to me. Just giving words of caution. :-?
 

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Serious_Funk said:
I would like to add upon SnowmanFX comment about what else could get into the underground tanks. From my personal experience, do not stop at a gas station that has the tanker truck filling the tanks. I had to replace a fuel pump (integrated filter) in my pickup because the tanker kicked up all the sentiment on the bottom of the tank and I pumped it into my truck :cry: I do not know if it was just one visit that did all the damage or the fact I used the same gas station many times before starting my morning commute. The time I stopped to get gas in the morning was right around the same time the tanker finished and left. Maybe its worth asking your local favorite gas station what time the tanker comes so you can avoid what happened to me. Just giving words of caution. :-?
Yeah, my dad used to tell me that all the time. It makes sense. I always watch out for that.
 
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