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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
STI Trunk Lid

I live in CT and rather than deal with new wheels/tires, worry about salt & sand scratching the paint, contend with FWD or RWD vehicles sliding into me, etc., I've decided to garage my STi for the winter-time. :cry: I love this car...and just don't want to deal w/those hassles. I'd rather it be kept nice and shiny garaged than be broken-hearted at every little sand mark or salt stain. I have never done this before and was wondering what I need to do in terms of maintenance during this period. I am planning on starting it peridoically (1x/week? More? Less?) I am just looking for some tips from folks who have done this before. All help is greatly appreciated!!!
 

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I understand how you feel and plan on doing the same, however, CT's weather isn't that bad, but I will not take the STi out on bad conditions. The project vehicle I had before the STi was mostly garaged during the winter. But there were times were all the snow was gone and the sand/salt was pushed to the side of the road. Those kind of days I would go for a cruise, but try to stay off the highways, especially 95. Your front end will look like it got sand blasted. :x

As for leaving it in the garage, keep an eye on all the fluids and tire pressure, and perform the scheduled maintenence. If your garage isn't heated, make sure the water resorvoir for the intercooler spray is half empty. Warm it up every 3 or 4 days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey Thorn - thanks very much for the advice. Should I plan on doing a wintertime oil change then (-shudder-)? Is there anything else, aside from making sure fluids are kept topped off, that needs to be addressed? Will starting it and letting it idle suffice, or should I plan around a 10-20 min. cruise weekly?
 

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A cruise every now and then is always good to keep the tires from flat spotting, the braking system working well and the driveline properly "worked in". Not to mention it will keep you from getting too itchy. I wouldn't bother with an oil change mid winter, but definitely first thing in the spring.

I plan to drive mine every now and then
 

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I'm also from CT and can't wait to run mine in the snow!! My snows (Dunlop M2) are on order from tirerack...all I have to say to mother nature is 'bring it on!!' Luckily I don't commute on the highway, so I won't have the high speed sand impingement problem...
 

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For sale.....

I got this from a mkiv.com, a supra website. But the list of storage will apply to most cars.

3. i'm going to store my supra for some time. how should i prepare it?
fuel system: fill the fuel tank and add stabilizer in appropriate ratio. run engine for a few minutes to ensure stabilized fuel has made it through the entire system.
engine: change the oil & filter and run the engine up to temperature. then put two table spoons of marvel mystery or similar fine lubricant into each cylinder, and crank the engine a few revolutions (don't start) to coat the cylinder walls and other metal in the upper cylinder with a film of oil.
cooling system: measure the supra coolant mix, if necessary flush the system and add a new coolant 50/50 mixture.
electrical system: disconnect the battery cables, put battery on smart charger.
tires: raise the supra on four jacks to save the tires from getting misshapen.
body: apply two coats of a carnauba-base wax to the Supra body.
exhaust: plug the exhaust end with a shield to prevent anything from entering the motor like humidity or little animals.
 

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just a question, i heard this from a friend:

is it true that you should run your AC on cold a couple of times during the winter to keep the nuts and bolts that run the cold AC lubricated?

also another winter question,

ive heard that the waiting time after driving hard for the turbo to "settle down" is about 2 minutes, does that time go up or down in cold conditions?
 
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Re: Can you repair BBS Rims?

orca said:
is it true that you should run your AC on cold a couple of times during the winter to keep the nuts and bolts that run the cold AC lubricated?
I've heard of that also, not sure if it's true or not but I run it a few times during the winter. I don't think it matters much if it runs on cold or hot but you'll notice that your car will defrost much quicker if the A/C is used with hot. When I go on long trips during the winter I will often turn the A/C on and dry out the air if it's humid.
 

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I'm not pro, but...

*Not Optional* Aftermarket rust proofing regardless of winterization, why the hell not spend the extra 100 bucks??? Better then a kick in the pants

Thorough car wash
Oil change
Take the bologna sandwich out of the trunk
Gasoline additive to stop tank condensation (I duno, it works for my diesel sailboat)
Jack up the car to avoid tire flat spots
Disconnect battery
Keep the windows cracked a little
Breathable car cover
Start it up every week and a bit, let it warm up, rev her a bit, cool down, kill it.

Blah, i think you should drive her in the winter, dont wimp out, thats what the awd is for.
 

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just add fuel stabilizer and put it to sleep. i would'nt recommend idling at all as moisture will build up and cause rust in the exhaust and anywhere else. a few months is nothing when garaging up a car. you should'nt even need to disconnect the battery. get an oil change in the spring and go. as for flat spots in the tires, i'm thinking on a nice winter day you might get the itch to go for a drive anyway..
 

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StuBrown said:
I live in CT and rather than deal with new wheels/tires, worry about salt & sand scratching the paint, contend with FWD or RWD vehicles sliding into me, etc., I've decided to garage my STi for the winter-time. :cry: I love this car...and just don't want to deal w/those hassles. I'd rather it be kept nice and shiny garaged than be broken-hearted at every little sand mark or salt stain. I have never done this before and was wondering what I need to do in terms of maintenance during this period. I am planning on starting it peridoically (1x/week? More? Less?) I am just looking for some tips from folks who have done this before. All help is greatly appreciated!!!
I go through this with my motorcycle every winter, but the routine should be fairly consistent:

-Thoroughly wash and wax the car, including the wheels.

-Change your oil immediately before storage. Old oil contains contaminants that can speed corrosion.

-Fill your gas tank and Use Stabil or some similar gas stabilizer before storage; run enough gas through the system that the stabilizer will get into your fuel injection system.

-Use a trickle charger or place the battery on a charger every couple of weeks; if your battery goes completely dead, it will be damaged.

-DO NOT start the car every few days. If you start it and only allow it to run for a few minutes, the engine and exhaust components will not get up to full operating temperature. Water is a by-product of the combustion process and will accumulate in components that are not heated to their operating temperature, resulting in drastically accelerated corrosion of those components. Either use the car periodically, driving for at least 15 - 20 minutes, or let it sit through the whole winter. DO NOT . . . repeat . . . DO NOT start the car intermittently.

-Put a little steel wool in the exhaust tip(s) to prevent mice from making a nest inside.

-Tires can develop flat spots if they sit on the same spot for months at a time, though this is not a huge problem with modern radials. You should consider putting the car on jacks or, at a minimum, inflating the tires to a very high pressure to minimize flat-spotting.

-Spray WD-40 on anything you think might be prone to rust. Lubricate your locks. Think about spraying electrical contact cleaner into switches and relays to displace dirt and moisture that may have accumulated in them.

-Slather your rubber moldings, etc. with a silicone protectant.

-Cover the car with a soft, scratchless cover. It's better to use a breathable cover, rather than something that would not allow the car to "breathe."

Waking your sleeping STi in the spring should be pretty easy. Check to make sure that no critters have taken up residence in your engine compartment. Adjust your tire pressure, check the oil, then let 'er rip. Give the car a minute or two at idle, since you want to make sure that the oil is fully distributed throughout the engine (and the turbo) before placing it under load. It's worthwhile to change your brake fluid asap, since brake fluid absorbs atmospheric moisture, degrading brake performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well thanks very much guys. I don't believe I could've asked for a more comprehensive answer to my query! I spent the bulk of the weekend detailing it in prep for the cold season, and will get it out onto blocks for an oil change in the next coupla weekends. It's going to HURT not being able to take her out, but with any luck I'll have a coupla 50 degree days that sneak in and allow me some seat time. Thx again.
 
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