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Discussion Starter #1
http://www.iwsti.com/forums/general-subaru-discussion/302404-how-safely-get-turbo-flutter-5.html

Why was this thread closed, as far as I can see the OP had a question which some people answered .

Not every modification that is done by a owner is popular, but if people don't like it the easy option is to not reply, if you do reply, they should ensure they supply data to back their claims, unfortunately some claims went unanswered.

During the replies, a debate started over the quality of a product, I replied with what I did as per manufacturers instruction and best practices, this can be found in the thread.

I supplied all required information to back my claims.

A "senior" member had a different opinion to me and made his claims based upon his research, which is good and how things should be, but when asked to supply information to back up his claims the member supplied no data or information for claims and the thread was closed.

So in summing up, if I have got this right, a tread was closed due to a "senior" member not being unable to back his claims with any data or evidence, just his opinion, where do the forum execs and administrators stand in relation to this.

If I am wrong or have broken any forum rules please let me know, as long as everyone is treated the same and there is no bias or favoritism.

Feel free to PM me in relation to this.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would rather see your data and evidence to back your claims.

And explain why on a dyno at 20psi the results are different from yours.

Or perma ban me because you cannot.

I'm just a member asking questions, your the "BRO TUNER".

"My move?", I'm not playing chess.
 

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why though? You literally argued for the sake of argument. You seriously think a good way to measure a BOV is to waste time on a dyno watching it?

people have been testing BOVs and boost leaks for years with the method of putting the intake tract under pressure. and its the correct way to do it.

The way I see it, you were simply trolling.
 

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I would rather see your data and evidence to back your claims.

And explain why on a dyno at 20psi the results are different from yours.

Or perma ban me because you cannot.

I'm just a member asking questions, your the "BRO TUNER".

"My move?", I'm not playing chess.
I suggest you read with the intent to understand as I literally provided video of the leaking I have been describing. Unlike you, I did not make up any numbers. Additionally, I am giving you my experience with many of these valves and many others. Do I have logs of when I was tuning some of these valves? Maybe, but I have not messed with one in so long, I couldn't tell you what customer file and what log(s) it would be in. As stated in my PM reply back to you, I have explained it several times, with an in-depth view of how it all plays into operation. You'd think a valve labeled "respons" wouldn't leak part that controls the diaphragm...

You can be a smart-ass all you want, I don't have the patience for it.

*you're... And I have answered the questions, but you cannot grasp the concepts.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Then why, in the YouTube link from GFB, with the explanation and test method show, on a dyno running psi it doesn't leak.

Expain to me then why mine doesn't leak when I use the same test method.

I'm seriously asking which part of this text from GFB is flawed:


"A smoke test indicates that the blow-off valve is leaking

A smoke test isn't a valid means of testing a blow-off valve for leaks – it doesn't replicate on-boost conditions. The problem with a smoke test is that the plumb back port is pressurised – this never happens when you're driving the car. On a Deceptor Pro this will cause smoke to escape from the trumpet. However, this doesn't mean that the valve leaks. Also, the smoke test does not pressurise the manifold, which the BOV relies on to remain shut under boost. As stated above, it's pretty difficult for a BOV to develop a serious air leak of the sort that would noticeably affect the way the car drives."

Taken from here > http://www.gfb.com.au/tech/troubleshooting/21-a-smoke-test-indicates-that-the-blow-off-valve-is-leaking

#Leemanfor, I'm not trolling, I am curious why one test method, on the dyno at 20psi, and another method gives such a different result.

The explanation and result given by GFB is typical to when I tested it.

YamahaSHO just telling me I'm wrong doesn't cut it, yes he posted a video of the test, but as far as I could see it wasn't on boost, what happens when it sees boost.

He can also talk down to me all he likes, I'm only interested in facts based on sound engineering principles, I care not for name calling.
 

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Then why, in the YouTube link from GFB, with the explanation and test method show, on a dyno running psi it doesn't leak.

Expain to me then why mine doesn't leak when I use the same test method.
Understand that if there is a leak, there is a leak. Running a motor with lots of vibration may mask any bubbles that may try to show or make it harder for a low mix of soap to cause bubbles. However, if you have leaks, it's leaking.


"A smoke test indicates that the blow-off valve is leaking

A smoke test isn't a valid means of testing a blow-off valve for leaks – it doesn't replicate on-boost conditions. The problem with a smoke test is that the plumb back port is pressurised – this never happens when you're driving the car. On a Deceptor Pro this will cause smoke to escape from the trumpet. However, this doesn't mean that the valve leaks. Also, the smoke test does not pressurise the manifold, which the BOV relies on to remain shut under boost. As stated above, it's pretty difficult for a BOV to develop a serious air leak of the sort that would noticeably affect the way the car drives."
I have not referenced a smoke test for a reason. However, you can smoke test an intake tract with boost.


YamahaSHO just telling me I'm wrong doesn't cut it, yes he posted a video of the test, but as far as I could see it wasn't on boost, what happens when it sees boost.

He can also talk down to me all he likes, I'm only interested in facts based on sound engineering principles, I care not for name calling.
Get your head out of your ass... I took the time to respond to you in detail several times. If you feel you are getting talked down to, it's because of your inability to follow a conversation and understand what is being said.

Since you cannot follow along with the conversation, this is me telling you to stop, for the last time.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
OK then, my vavle must be the only one that doesn't leak when tested under load, oh, and the valve in the video, and of course the other valves I have seen tested.

BTW, this is a debate over test methods isn't it, are you suggesting that I should refrain from stating results that differ from yours, are you saying, because I am disagreeing with you, and saying that your testing methods appear to he flawed, you will ban me?

Have I been rude, used fowl language, threatened you?

Or are you abusing your power as a moderator?

I like this site, lots of information to be had, lots of nice builds, but if you feel the need to ban me for disagreeing with you, go for it, you are just another backyard mechanic with aspirations of grandeur to me.

Anyways, I'm sure you know best, you keep telling me that anyway.

Happy tuning.

Good luck to your customers.
 

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A smoke test isn't a valid means of testing a blow-off valve for leaks – it doesn't replicate on-boost conditions. The problem with a smoke test is that the plumb back port is pressurised – this never happens when you're driving the car. On a Deceptor Pro this will cause smoke to escape from the trumpet. However, this doesn't mean that the valve leaks. Also, the smoke test does not pressurise the manifold, which the BOV relies on to remain shut under boost. As stated above, it's pretty difficult for a BOV to develop a serious air leak of the sort that would noticeably affect the way the car drives."
I'ts not uncommon to for engineers to design valves that only seal will under pressure. Many of them are directional, like a reed valve. but that's not their only use. I don't know enough about the pressure a blow off valve sees to offer an opinion. But, I will also say that smoke anD pressure testing intake systems is so common, that I would never choose a valve that leaks any time even if it might actually do the job.

BTW, this is a debate over test methods isn't it, are you suggesting that I should refrain from stating results that differ from yours, are you saying, because I am disagreeing with you, and saying that your testing methods appear to he flawed, you will ban me?
Have I been rude, used fowl language, threatened you?
No.


I like this site, lots of information to be had, lots of nice builds, but if you feel the need to ban me for disagreeing with you, go for it
It shouldn't happen . . . IMHO
 
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