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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I have researched and have a copy of the SPT manual for timing belt change. I have a 2005 STi and I was changing the timing belt. The problem is that on the intake/exhaust cam grears on the drivers side, I cannot get them to stay lined up with the 2 line markings.

To set it into place is very difficult. I had to cut my old timing belt so that I can use that to rotate the gear into place because there is no way for me to move the gear by hand. It has toooo much tension so what happens afterwards is that when I try to adjust the exhaust one, the intake one (after I have spent several minutes trying to get it to stay steady on the markings) seems to spring right out of place.

What the heck can I do to be able to spin those gears to the correct markings without having to use a used and cut timing belt and sooo much force? What can I do to hold them there once I do have them lined up correctly so that they don't spring/spin out of place? The cam gears have no spokes so I can't put anything to jam/lock them while I can get the belt on.

Is there something I can buy like in Sears(tool)? Please let me know if there is something I am not doing right

Thanks
 

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First off I have never done this so I'll just take a shot at it...

Maybe take the sparkplugs out so there would be no compression to fight you.:notsure:


unix4linux said:
Ok, I have researched and have a copy of the SPT manual for timing belt change. I have a 2005 STi and I was changing the timing belt. The problem is that on the intake/exhaust cam grears on the drivers side, I cannot get them to stay lined up with the 2 line markings.

To set it into place is very difficult. I had to cut my old timing belt so that I can use that to rotate the gear into place because there is no way for me to move the gear by hand. It has toooo much tension so what happens afterwards is that when I try to adjust the exhaust one, the intake one (after I have spent several minutes trying to get it to stay steady on the markings) seems to spring right out of place.

What the heck can I do to be able to spin those gears to the correct markings without having to use a used and cut timing belt and sooo much force? What can I do to hold them there once I do have them lined up correctly so that they don't spring/spin out of place? The cam gears have no spokes so I can't put anything to jam/lock them while I can get the belt on.

Is there something I can buy like in Sears(tool)? Please let me know if there is something I am not doing right

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
jasv11 said:
First off I have never done this so I'll just take a shot at it...

Maybe take the sparkplugs out so there would be no compression to fight you.:notsure:
Thanks for the reply. The spark plugs are already off on the side/head I am working on that giving me a hard time. I was changing them as well and putting a new timing belt. The spark plugs on the passenger side are already installed though. But I don't see how the spark plugs on the other side would affect compression to another side. :-\
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
trnkmnky said:
well since all the pistons are connected to the crank, then compession on one side would effect the other side. I think??
Hmmm....you could be right, but the reason why I don't see this working is because I thought what was actually springing the cam gears out of place right after I had them aligned was:

1. If I tap anything on the engine or make any movements it would disturb the tension on the cam gears making them spin out of timing marks.

2. the springs in the head are sooo stiff that if the cam lobe is not holding it down correctly its spins freely

Sighhh...this sucks!!!...lol

im going to see if i can find something useful at sears...please let me know if there is anything else you guys can suggest
 

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well youre not really fighting compression, youre fighting the valves and springs and etc. i have never done an sti, but i have done a few timing belts in my day. you prolly should not have cut the belt, once you loosened the tension on the belt the cams would have come to rest out of time. and once you slipped the new belt on the tensioner should have pulled them back into time. atleast thats the way i do them on cars at the shop. but a subaru is a different machine...so good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi All,

Thanks for the help and efforts. I finally got my timing belt all setup and the car runs very well. I am not having problems. It basically came down to getting a 10mm T-Handle hex key for the drivers side intake/exhaust cam gears.

In a nutshell, I used the hex key to line up the markings (this was soooo much easier that using the old cut belt to rotate the gears in place. Once I lined them up, I used the hex key to hold the intake gear in place while a buddy of mine placed the belt on there. Since the exhaust cam gear only needs tension towards the outside of the gear (that is of course until you place the belt on the passenger side cam gears), I didn't bother trying to hold that one in place because it doesn't easily get disturbed.

Then, I moved on to the the pass. side gears and voila, the damn thing is nice and fit with the correct timing. The markings on the belt are great help because you don't have to worry about skipping teeth during the install. You give yourself the right amount of slack from the very beginning.

I took pictures and notes during this because I know that not all of us have the right tools to lock those gears in place. I will organize my pics and notes and post up the info here in the next few days as I am swamped with work.

BTW - I still will be getting the lock key for the cams from subaru to lock the gears in place prior to taking any old belts off. This was painful so lesson learned :)
 

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Too late now, but for the next guy, I just use a handfull of c-clamps, starting at the crank sprocket and working clockwise (getting those driver's side SOBs lined up next) gently clamping each mark in place and clamping to a couple of the other pullies to hold it still.

Loosening the lower left (passenger side) idler pully makes the whole process easier too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Toophless said:
Too late now, but for the next guy, I just use a handfull of c-clamps, starting at the crank sprocket and working clockwise (getting those driver's side SOBs lined up next) gently clamping each mark in place and clamping to a couple of the other pullies to hold it still.

Loosening the lower left (passenger side) idler pully makes the whole process easier too.
Indeed, I also have to check out that c-clamp method. Looks like NOWWWWWWWWWWW after im done there are various approaches. This is definately not a job to do when you are fustrated. You can't think straight or outside the box ;-)

Thanks for the info
 

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The belt is marked to line up with each position. Start it in the proper position and it doesn't matter which side goes on first. if you put the belt on the crank gear then the passenger side gears first, it will hold the driver's intake as you put that on and continue to include the driver's exhaust gear, which stays in place by itself. Take off the belt tensioner to remove the old belt. Compress the plunger vertically over several minutes with a c clamp not in a vise. Its not hard to compress if you go slow enough to feel it compress. Put a hardened pin not a paper clip through the holes to hold the plunger compressed. Reinstall the tensioner torquing the bolt. Make sure the cams are positioned as shown in the service manual. Line up the crank marks. Don't use the triangle mark. Start the belt on the crank gear and go to the passenger side first. Leave the belt loose over the passenger idler pulley. Get a 10mm allen socket and use a torque wrench or breaker bar to easily control the intake driver's gear as you install the belt and continue to include the exhaust gear. The exhaust gear stays on it's own. Now work the belt over the idler pulley. Check all marks. I hand turn the assemby to double check for interference using the crank bolt. If everything is good, unpin the tensioner. I only use the PE blue kevlar belt. Less stretch over it's life and almost no movement of the tensioner when you unpin it. You do have to mark that belt yourself by transferring marks from a new belt or marking your old one before you remove it and transferring from that.
 
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