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Mr Clean Auto Dry

The dealer reccomended not going above 5000rpm for the first 1000 miles, and i have done this religiously, im wondering if 1000 miles is enough, should i go to 2000 miles, will this do anything.

thanks
 

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Agree, 4000RPM should be the limit for the first 1000 miles. Also try modulating the gas pedal while cruising on the expressway so you are no leaving the engine at the same RPMs for a long time. I usually play with 5th and 6th and alternate hi acceleration with coasting.
 

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I always, if anything, change the heck out of the oil when I breeeak a motor in , whether new or rebuilt same routine.

AT 250 miles change oil and filter and inspect the drain plug for any metallic bits, then same thing at 500, 1000, and 1500 miles. I also use regular dinosaur oil during this period, NOT synthetic because its too much of a good thing, you want some of that oil to stick to the bore of the cylinders to help seat the rings properly and end up with a nice high compression ratio. If you use synthetic from the get go you'll have less residual oil in the bores because that stuff is SO slick. WHich is great, IF you have a broken in engine.

This may sound anal, but remember, the most metal debris you get out of the motor is when it is brand new and the rings are still taking a good seat...

After about 10-15k miles I started going with synthetic.

Some folks say 1500 miles is the break in point, some say 1000. More can't hurt I guess, except when you let that civic dog you at a stop light...

I've also heard the factory runs the motors on the car for 500 miles before the odometer gets hooked up and it goes to the dealers. Anyone know anything about this?
 

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Antimullet said:
I've also heard the factory runs the motors on the car for 500 miles before the odometer gets hooked up and it goes to the dealers. Anyone know anything about this?
I HIGHLY doubt that! Just think of the financial aspect of it. 500 miles at around 16-20 MPG is at least 25 gallons of fuel per vehicle. Then even more expensive, is the time needed to run the car for 500 miles. We are talking thousands and thousands of dollars to do this for the Sti's.

As for break in period, you really only need to break motors in for 500 miles. These miles are not to be just treat it like a baby miles either. You want to vary RPM's and throttle input so that you properly seat the rings at different cylinder pressures and at different engine speeds. Running the motor only at a conservative 3000 RPM for the first 500 is not the way to break the motor in. These are high performance engines, not brittle little sticks. DRIVE THE CAR.

Think of it this way. Have any of you had any friends who actually sold car at a dealership. If you do, ask them how they treat the cars that come of the trailer. Ask them also how most cars are test driven by potential buyers.
 

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Think of it this way. Have any of you had any friends who actually sold car at a dealership. If you do, ask them how they treat the cars that come of the trailer. Ask them also how most cars are test driven be potential buyers.
What's that got to do with it? Test drivers and porters could care less about break in periods because it is not their car. When it comes to break in just follow the owner's manual.
 

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I think his point is that simply the dealership personal have NO CLUE how to break in or take care of these cars. Many sti's- maybe even mine- were taken on hi-speed prolonged test runs above recc rpm's. My salesman implored me to "open it up so i could really experience its performance. So the point i believe he was trying to make is that many cars seem to take this abuse at the dealer- but still end up fine!
 

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Quote:

Think of it this way. Have any of you had any friends who actually sold car at a dealership. If you do, ask them how they treat the cars that come of the trailer. Ask them also how most cars are test driven be potential buyers.


What's that got to do with it? Test drivers and porters could care less about break in periods because it is not their car. When it comes to break in just follow the owner's manual.
i think his point is that your car has probably been bounced off the rev limiter a few times before you even bought it.
 

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A bit off topic, but have you seen how many miles cars have on them when they get tested by magazines? In R&T comparo of the Sti and the Evo, "both cars only had 500 miles or so on their odometers." And magazine testers definitely bounce off the rev limiter a few times.
:eek:
 

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I honestly believe the break-in period is less important, than just changing the oil within the first 1000 miles. In 1998 when I bought my Turbo Eclipse, I actually started modifing the vehicle with 90 miles on it. I gunned it and boosted her many times before the 500 mile period was over. But I did change the oil and filter at 1000 and 3000 miles. Oh, by the way I have never used synthetic in her to this day. Wal-Mart 10-40, no joke.

What I'm trying to get to is this. 130,000 miles, 435 HP and 100 passes down the quarter mile later, she still purrs like a she did at 3000 miles. Maintanance and fine tuning will ensure a long life, not some baby 500 mile period. Prove me wrong.
 

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That's a double-edged sword. No one can prove you wrong, but you can't prove people wrong who say that it IS important. No one is denying that good maintenance and treatment of the car is important, so unless you can find someone who is willing to break it in and not maintain it, then someone who breaks in it and maintains it, then someone who doesn't care about the break in or maintenance, you don't have scientific evidence either way. Just opinions. If you can't back it up with some sort of controlled study, you can't prove anything.

Bottom line is take reasonable care of the car and do what makes you feel better about how you treat it. And obviously, do the basic maintenance items like oil, etc, when it needs it.
 

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My mechanic breaks-in and tunes all the motors he builds on the dyno nearly right away. After finishing a fresh motor, he usually drives it to the dyno (15 miles) at first he idle's the car for 5-10 min, then he starts driving it lightly on the way to the dyno, after a mile or two he gets on it a little more and a little more. Once he makes it to the dyno, he changes the oil. He figures its already broken in 80% in the first 15 miles. Then he does some low boost and then high boost pulls on the dyno (while tuning) and after that he hands over the keys to the customer. Last car was an 1991 MR2 turbo making over 450HP!

But yeah I see what you guys are saying, after spending 30K+ on a new car, you kinda want to baby it for awhile, even if the bastard shipping guys at the dealer already revved the shit out it...LOL
 

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Everyone has his or her own opinions on this subject, and mine is to follow the owners manual, because I think there's got to be a reason why they want you to drive a certain way during break-in. We follow the owners manual on everything else that we buy, so why not w/ a car?!
 

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OK so break in is important. NO on can argue that point, atleast not logically, however the arguemtn can be made for different recomendations. Normally some breaking in is advised and the Dino oil is prefered by most. Synthetics are very jighly praised (yes even by me) however the time at wich to use them is under contention. With todays engineering quality and abliity to machne parts to a much tighter spec, i can't see more that 1000 miles or so would be necessary. But if you read all the other posts on this subject, MOST of them come up with about the same idea... Don't kill it the 1st day but then when it is broken in get some synth oil and go do what the car was designed to do...Have Fun
 

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I'm picking up my STI tomorrow evening and I've given a bit of thought to how I should break it in.

First, let me say one thing that almost never gets mentioned in these threads: keeping the revs under 4000 rpm is MUCH less important than managing cylinder pressures during the first 50-100 miles when the rings are seating. When the WRX first came out, some idiots over on NASIOC were posting about how they were at full boost all the time during break-in, but since they shifted at 4k it was fine! :roll: I wonder how many quarts they're burning between oil changes now...

The "modern engine" break-in--consisting of just enough miles to seat the rings, with constant moderate throttle runs up and down the rpm range--makes the most sense to me. The dealership is about 70 miles from my house, so I'll take back roads all the way home and change the oil as soon as I get home. While that should seat the rings properly, I'll still take it easy on the boost for a couple of hundred miles after that. No reason in the world why 1000 miles is a magic number, though.

Remember: Accountants and marketing execs write owners manuals, not engineers. If the engine makes it out of warranty--they've done their job adequately. There's no way they would put a complicated break-in regimen in the user manual; it's got to be moron-proof. It's a cynical outlook, but just about everyone who posts on these boards is a statistical outlier in the eyes of a car company. I prefer to take the extra steps to run and maintain my car so that it will still be in top shape long after the warranty is past.
 

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There's a lot of information out there that says that you want high pressure (high boost and rpm's to boot...) to seat your rings properly.....

I'm *still* undecided about this one....
 

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Jon said:
First, let me say one thing that almost never gets mentioned in these threads: keeping the revs under 4000 rpm is MUCH less important than managing cylinder pressures during the first 50-100 miles when the rings are seating. When the WRX first came out, some idiots over on NASIOC were posting about how they were at full boost all the time during break-in, but since they shifted at 4k it was fine! :roll: I wonder how many quarts they're burning between oil changes now...
Vary RPM's - Vary throttle input. Conservative driving. Simple and to the point.

Also remember, full boost at 4000 RPM is no where near the same as full boost at redline. I'm not saying go ahead at full boost at low RPM at every redlight during break-in, but it's not as bad as racing 1/4 mi drags.
 

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So maybe the most important question is: how much cylinder pressure is enough, and how much is too much? If you take a brand new engine and put full throttle and 15psi through it, won't you blow right past the poorly-sealing brand new rings?

I understand that big-money race teams run their engines in on a dyno at high rpms. I bet they don't have the boost cranked up when they do it, though. After my mechanic rebuilt the Celica motor, he pegged the wastegate open, and we put 200 hard revving miles on it before allowing boost.
 

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Breaking in the engine with little boost could be a way to go, however you do want a small amount of boost so that the rings aligne themselve more horizntallly than being at and angle due to the boost pressure and combustion pressure. This is for long duration applications only... a.k.a a car we drive to work. If you don't mind how long the engine lasts... racers, dragers...ect. Then you would not care as much about how the rings seat, as long as they seat. To much boost pressure would simply force blow by and contaminate your oil faster, and it would blow the oil up onto the cylinderwalls and maybe make break in take a tad longer. But undo early stress is unwarranted and unnecessary. Yes 1000 mile is probably over the top... but just dont take it home and bounce on it. We want the limited edition STI to be the longest running LE car out there.... so we can all get together in 20 years or so.
 
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