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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I?m new to this so bare with me. I have an 06 STI and other than a turbo timer and a new air intake the car is pretty much stock. I?m looking to get more power but not to the point of ?racecar?. The car is my ?daily driver? but isn?t because my job provides me with a vehicle to drive to and from work. So with all that being said what would y?all suggest doing? I?m pretty new to the Subaru game as I come from building dune buggies and Baja bugs which are completely different animals in their own. I?m open to any and all suggestions.


Thanks

-Luke
 

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stock turbo? no need to have a turbo timer then. stock turbo is water cooled.

Whats your goals? more power? catless downpipe, EBCS, intake, tune is pretty fun. Plenty of power for a DD.

Get a Cobb Accessport. V3
 

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A GD! Because of what you've written I can recommend:

Drive the car stock for a bit. You want to be able to feel the difference on the mods I will list here.

Down-pipe and a tune. Cobb stage two - or an un-catted DP and pro-tune.
Handling is as important as power and make as much difference in your car. You "need" a means to get far more negative camber than you can get stock.

Do these and see how hard you get bit. If you do proceed. What to do with these cars is well documented here and elsewhere. Use the time learn. Decide what you want, what you are willing (or happy to) tolerate, and what you want to spend. Come up with a goal and plan.

Stiffer sway bars and springs, engine, trans, and pitch-stop are all common mods but will increase NHV and I'd highly recommend doing them before any big power increases.

I love my GD :) :) :)
 

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I've been perfectly happy with a tanabe 3" catback all stainless steel, A perrin turbo inlet(my OE developed a common tear where it slips over the turbo inlet, so changed it myslef) and a cobb stage 1 93 octane tune and have run it like that for the past 5 years, plenty of DD fun. Only other add ons are a programmable boost gauge, and Kenwood touch screen. This is what I consider my "base setup" as a precursor to doing any other mods that I might get into with my ownership of the car. I am probably going to pull the trigger on a cobb downpipe this year though and flash the stage 2 93 octane tune.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Yeah the turbo timer was already on there from the previous owner. Ive already been looking into a cat less exhaust and I was wondering how much of a difference the Cobb accessport made? Thanks everyone for the suggestions. Now what suspension and sway bars would you go to? Any suggestions? Give me a couple of suggestions for each exhaust so I know a good directions to go in
 

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Stage one on my 06 improved throttle response over the oem tune, pulled a little better under boost, and the car accelerated slightly faster. It increased boost. Basically the engine is more responsive, and you can feel it.
 

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Yeah the turbo timer was already on there from the previous owner. Ive already been looking into a cat less exhaust and I was wondering how much of a difference the Cobb accessport made? Thanks everyone for the suggestions. Now what suspension and sway bars would you go to? Any suggestions? Give me a couple of suggestions for each exhaust so I know a good directions to go in
You need a total cost you will never go over and achievable goals within that cost. Just about all the name brand down pipes work. Decisions are pro-tune or OTS, and then, catted or not. I recommended Cobb Stage 2 because the parts are decent, you get the AP which in the US is almost the universal tuning tool, and you can do it yourself. But if you want to go catless or are absolutely sure you are willing to spend a lot of money and expect to get over 400 AWHP then use a different DP with no restriction and pro-tune. Invidias are common but there are quite a few. Catless pipes are relatively inexpensive and you might well find one used. Might be enough savings over a new catted pipe to pay for a pro-tune and with a good tuner you'd definitely come out ahead in terms of performance.

I didn't recommend handling parts because they will all increase NVH. So, what you want depends on what you are willing to tolerate, and for struts or their replacements, cost. I also didn't recommend doing them until you are familiar with the car and have decided there is something you want to change. If you are not finding a GDs limitations and understand a bit about them, then there is no reason to spend money in this area. There are members here who have had GDs for years and haven't realized how badly their car is limited by it's stock parts. If you are one of them, then why bother. If you are sensitive to a harsher ride you will have to forgo handling mods or compromise on both.

To the site admins: Are there old posts that have gone away. Seem impossible sometimes to find posts that I know existed say 10 years ago when GD mods were being worked out.
 

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Accessport is a must if you are going to be modding, these cars need to be tuned whenever you change the air flow, fueling, etc. I would recommend getting a accessport and Cobb turbo back and drive it like that for awhile while you research and learn. Also being up to date on all of the maintenance is a good idea. Good luck
 

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^^^^This before doing anything upgrade wise to the car do all the maintenance work required for the mileage you have. The access port reads and stores and clears trouble codes. Spark plugs should be done every 60,000 miles assuming they are the stock sti spec irridiums, change them if you don't have a record of them being done and stay with the stock oem spec plug. Check for any power steering leaks at the lines going into the pump and the rack under the car...there is a return line assembly that is routed parallel to the rack under the car that is a common leak spot with age. The drive belt tensioner pulley bearing can wear out and cause noise and belt slipping issues with a lot of mileage, as i stated before the turbo inlet hose can develop a tear where it clamps to the turbo inlet...if it happens it will make the turbo a bit louder and can cause subtle leaning of the air fuel mixture..it just won't be pulling as smoothly. But you wouldn't know any better until you actually discovered a tear and fixed it. Top plastic tank of the oem radiator can develop a leak all around the seam where the aluminum crimps clamp it to the radiator core, if you smell coolant after driving and shutting the car off as in checking your oil glance down at the radiator top tank along those aluminum crimps and look for seepage....oem replacement koyo radiators are available from the major parts dealers. Timing belt should be replaced if you have 100,000 miles or 10 years if the car sat for along span of time not being used. I'm still on my original belt but my car is used weekly if not daily and has 82,000. You can inspect the belt for cracks by removing the drivers side timing belt cover, mine looked fine, but might change it within the year anyway.

So just some other things to be aware of before money is put into mods. Compression tests are not really necessary unless you are using oil under normal driving and or have other symptoms like low idle vacuum, rough idle poor Performance and or smoke out the tailpipe, if not don't bother with a. Compression. Test unless you are changing your plugs anyway and have access to a gauge already. I've never done one to my 06 since getting it in 2009, but mines runs as good or better then when I got it with 29,000 miles and I'm a at 82,000 now. No noticeable oil useage.

Oh yeah don't use a wrench to install a new oil filter it can cause a leak if too tight that will be hard to spot. Tighten it by hand until the o ring seats and then using a rag another 1/2 turn, and start the car after filling with fresh oil let it get warm Rev to 3000 rpm for a few seconds and then check for any oil seepage..should be bone dry at the filter. Always use a new crush washer on the oil pan drain bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Accessport is a must if you are going to be modding, these cars need to be tuned whenever you change the air flow, fueling, etc. I would recommend getting a accessport and Cobb turbo back and drive it like that for awhile while you research and learn. Also being up to date on all of the maintenance is a good idea. Good luck
Awesome, I was actually looking into the Cobb turbo back and an access port but didn?t know if it would really be worth it. I?ll definitely be purchasing both.

Any other suggestions?
 

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Awesome, I was actually looking into the Cobb turbo back and an access port but didn?t know if it would really be worth it. I?ll definitely be purchasing both.

Any other suggestions?
That's all you'll need to run 12's in the 1/4 and low 4's 0-60 if that matters, but for most that's is all , especially for a daily driver. Tires make a HUGE difference with these, Bridgestone RE11 michellin pilot sport comp etc etc...any good reputation extreme performance summer tires are a necessity to get the most out of the stock chassis let alone a modded, 06. Lastly might consider a brake fluid flush if it hasn't been done and an overall brake inspection for wear, lots of options for pads and rotors out there for these cars, maybe +1 or 2mm adjustable rear sway bar to round it all off,.
 

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It's all about budget, it will respond typically to other platforms.

If you build like I do, get a budget, goal and timeline, then spend the next month or 2 researching before doing anything.

Find a good tuner, talk to them about it, not some guy, or OTS tunes, look at what they tune, their reputation in motorsport, why, because getting the most power reliably is what wins championships, translate that to your daily and you have a winning combination.

Most importantly, 50% of information is rubbish, don't trust anything or anyone (me included) until you have researched, tested using sound engineering principles and seen first hand.

Everyone will have a opinion, but as you know opinions are like arse holes, everyone has one.

The car is oldish and generally they get treated hard, If the car is a fresh purchase throw it on a dyno, do a full inspection, major service would be my first call before doing anything though.

Again the platform is old, modifications are well documented, it just depends on $$$$.

My first money spent would be on the servicing, brakes and handling.

The car is near on ten years old, the dampeners, bushings and other rubber parts are most likely pretty poor.

I believe that having a car that handles and stops is the number one priority before any power mods, you will find the handling difference night and day.
 

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^

and

maybe +1 or 2mm adjustable rear sway bar to round it all off,.
This is a GD. Keep the bars square (same size front and rear). +2 is a "soft upgrade. A stiff upgrade would be +4. Hollow 25s are lighter and app the same stiffness, and are the most common (high) performance oriented option. Adjustable rear? A lot of em are.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Awesome, I was actually looking into the Cobb turbo back and an access port but didn?t know if it would really be worth it. I?ll definitely be purchasing both.

Any other suggestions?
That's all you'll need to run 12's in the 1/4 and low 4's 0-60 if that matters, but for most that's is all , especially for a daily driver. Tires make a HUGE difference with these, Bridgestone RE11 michellin pilot sport comp etc etc...any good reputation extreme performance summer tires are a necessity to get the most out of the stock chassis let alone a modded, 06. Lastly might consider a brake fluid flush if it hasn't been done and an overall brake inspection for wear, lots of options for pads and rotors out there for these cars, maybe +1 or 2mm adjustable rear sway bar to round it all off,.
Ok so back to the exhaust portion of this I?m looking to get a full catless exhaust. So with that being said, what type of downpipe do I need? A divorced waste gate catless, the catless 02 sensor bung, or a both together?!
 

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Ok so back to the exhaust portion of this I?m looking to get a full catless exhaust. So with that being said, what type of downpipe do I need? A divorced waste gate catless, the catless 02 sensor bung, or a both together?!
Bellmouth, divorced, cat or catless, all need to be researched together, if you go catless you may need to play with the wastegate due to creep, maybe, your tuner may be able to sort it or port it, or you could go external waste gate, then the divorced would be redundant and you would be best off with a bellmouth.

As for divorced vs bellmouth, lots of views with varying opinions IRT turbulence and flow dynamics, good reading for a lazy day.

I'm still on OEM turbo and internals, I use a Invidia Bellmouth AU spec with the high flow cat, I like a high flow cat to negate some of the fuel smell from the exhaust.

I highly doubt the high flow cat would pass an emissions though, it's pretty rough behind the car on start up.

As for what brand, most will flow typically, quality on the other hand is where you need to look, metallurgy and design.

Have fun.
 

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I highly doubt the high flow cat would pass an emissions though, it's pretty rough behind the car on start up.
Cobbs do in the US . Im pretty sure all the decent ones do.

Cold? CATs don't work cold - they have to get hot. Thats why they are at the front of the exhaust system and normally a bit away from the engine.

As for what brand, most will flow typically, quality on the other hand is where you need to look, metallurgy and design.
 

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Cobbs do in the US . Im pretty sure all the decent ones do.

Cold? CATs don't work cold - they have to get hot. Thats why they are at the front of the exhaust system and normally a bit away from the engine.
LOL, I had a brain fart IRT the cat at cold start, I'm still sceptical on whether it would pass here with a Euro 5 rating though, even at temp, if it was retuned IOT pass then yeah maybe, but on it's current tune I highly doubt it.

From previous experience with a number of different aftermarket cats, on different cars I've had, you really need to tune for emmisions to get a high flow to pass.

Our testing and standards may not be the same though, we use the IM240.

What is the IM240 Test?
“The IM240 Emissions Test is a 240 second simulation that runs a car through a range of engine load and revolutions per minute (RPM) scenarios on a dynamometer. It involves connecting the car’s exhaust to a bank of gas analysers to measure noxious gasses in grams per kilometre.”
• IM240 covers approximately 3.1 km, with a maximum speed of 91.2 km/h and an average speed of 47.3 km/h.
• It is a minimum requirement under the national code of practice (NCOP) for light vehicle construction and modification where the engine is modified or swapped.
• It involves measuring tailpipe emissions, namely carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), total hydrocarbons (HC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx).
• A test report is provided with measured emissions in g/km.
• No pass/fail mark is given. It is up to the VASS engineer to determine which vehicle standard and limits it must meet.
• Not all engine modifications or swaps need engineering certification (refer to the NCOP for details).

What Are Our Tips to Pass?
• Ensure you have the engine tuned prior to emissions testing- this has the greatest impact on emissions results.
• Running the engine rich increases hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide outputs.
• Running it lean increases engine operating temperature and increase in nitrogen oxides NOx.

I copied/pasta this from a testing facility.

Was the Cobb cat car tuned for it to pass, I've seen big power drops trying to get high flow cats to pass, some never did and a OEM cat was needed.
 

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I don't think our emissions tests are anything like that at least not most states.

But you have this - and cash. For us to get by when we shouldn't means outright falsification.

• No pass/fail mark is given. It is up to the VASS engineer to determine which vehicle standard and limits it must meet.
• Not all engine modifications or swaps need engineering certification (refer to the NCOP for details).
Was the Cobb cat car tuned for it to pass, I've seen big power drops trying to get high flow cats to pass, some never did and a OEM cat was needed.
To be honest I don't know! :) Shop never said a word about it. They did know it was my DD and I would have thought they knew it needed to pass - and it has. That said my dyno sheet is not high for the build, which I can explain/justify for many reasons, this being one. I can say the first summer I drove it it was magic and passed emissions :)
 
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